Event Archive

Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, September 24, 2021 The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, to reveal overlaps and connections across areas of interesting and methodological approaches. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features researchers, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, the University will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration. 

COVID Modifications:
In an effort to be responsive to changing health/safety protocol, Red Hot Research will be held in the main space of The Commons, with limited seating. Refreshments will be provided after the presentations in the Weaver Courtyard, outside.

Presenters:

Amy Burgin, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology/Kansas Biological Survey, Local, Climate Change, Informed Conversations
Hong Tien Vu, Journalism & Mass Communications, Strategic Framing, Climate Change, NGOs, Media, Message Elements
Trevor Lies (he/him/his), Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Whiteness, Racialization, Politics
Molly Zahn (she/her/hers), Religious Studies, Religion, Story, Interpretation, Environment, Interdependence

Emcee: Ali Brox, Environmental Studies Program

Activity, Discussion, Framing the Dialogue
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, September 23, 2021 Online

RESTORATIVE PRACTICES & WELLNESS

Presented by the KU First Nations Student Association, the KU School of Social Welfare Toni Johnson Center for Racial and Social Justice, and The Commons

Dr. Melissa Holder, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska | Assistant Professor, KU School of Social Welfare
Laurie Ramirez, MSW, Ojibway | Associate Professor of Practice / Liaison to Native Communities, KU School of Social Welfare

“What is the duty of humans? If gifts and responsibilities are one, then asking ‘What is our responsibility?’ is the same as asking ‘What is our gift?’ It is said that only humans have the capacity for gratitude. This is among our gifts.”
Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

What can practicing well-being teach us?
What are the relationships between well-being and reciprocity?

Learn about human-centered approaches to healing and restorative therapies adopted to overcome historical and individual trauma. Following the presentation, participants may share their own practices for healing, restoration, and transformation. We hope to build community and skills for self-care and healing in more and meaningful ways.

Community Learning & Practice is presented by KU First Nations Student Association and The Commons to offer space for building understanding around topics resonating with researchers at KU and in public life in 2021. These sessions lead with Indigenous values and practice, including reciprocity, relationship, and reconciliation.

Link to Register on Zoom.

Coffee @ The Commons, Framing the Dialogue, Humans in a More Than Human World, Student Event
Amitav Ghosh
2:00-3:00pm CT Tuesday, September 21, 2021 The Commons

Presented in partnership with the Hall Center for the Humanities

How do the threats of climate change affect populations differently?
How do western value systems reinforce the trajectory of a warming planet?
Who possesses the knowledge needed to restore human relationships with the Earth?

Amitav Ghosh is a renowned author of fiction and nonfiction, including The Ibis Trilogy--Sea of Poppies, River of Smoke, and Flood of Fire; The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable; Gun Island; and most recently, The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis.

Coffee @ The Commons is a conversation-style event, which offers space for informal dialogue with visiting scholars. Conversation Guide: Ali Brox, Environmental Studies Program.

Amitav Ghosh will speak at 7:30pm CT on Tuesday, September 21 as part of the Humanities Speaker Series.

Activity, Care & Well-being
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, September 16, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; with support from the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Environmental Studies Program.

This session features an opportunity to reflect, in community, on ongoing events surrounding the Common Work of Art, Native Hosts, by Cheyenne & Arapaho artist Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds.

Additionally, we will host an exercise in connecting to place, by examining ‘species loneliness,’ an idea described by Robin Wall Kimmerer in Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. Through experiencing for ourselves, we will explore how we might know a species better.

Zoom Registration Link.

Activity, Care & Well-being, Discussion
12:00-1:00pm Thursday, September 2, 2021 The Commons
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, the Spencer Museum of Art, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; with support from the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Environmental Studies Program

This session features extended check-in time with one another. Spotlight on Care offers space for meeting, sharing, and receiving, with a dedicated commitment to building community. Sessions are open to all and feature compassion-centered approaches to facilitation and participation.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Sunday, August 15, 2021 The Commons

The Commons is undergoing a website rebuilding. To that end, all future events will be posted on the new website (and until that launches, can be viewed at https://calendar.ku.edu/

We look forward to seeing you online or in person this fall!

Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
1:00-2:00pm CDT Thursday, May 13, 2021 Online
Presented by the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative

Learn about this new seed funding opportunity for scholars, students, and community collaborators.

For more details on the grants, this is a link to more information.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Activity, Care & Well-being, Discussion
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, May 6, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art; with support from the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring

Casey Mesick Braun (Curator of Global Indigenous Art at the Spencer Museum of Art), and Cara Weeks Neuburger (ATR, LCPC at Sunflower Art Therapy), will co-facilitate a session that explores how art can promote well-being, adaptability, and self-care. Casey will lead a slow exploration of a newly commissioned artwork currently on view in the exhibition Healing, Knowing, Seeing the Body at the Spencer Museum of Art, offering an opportunity for pause, reflection, and contemplation. Cara will then guide us through an art-making activity to promote creative ways for self-care. No special materials are required. 

Link to Zoom Registration.

Activity, Care & Well-being, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Humans in a More Than Human World
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, April 22, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art; with support from the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring

How might thinking with plants and animals allow us a different lens through which to see our present world and histories—and help to imagine futures? What do we learn when we seek alternative sources of wisdom, ones that resist narratives of productivity, accumulation, and disposability? How can we practice listening to our intuition, to our own heart? This session will explore and inspire the cultivation of personal and creative practices that deepen our relationships with the more-than-human persons who live with and around us. We’ll explore possibilities for collaboration through a look at the prairie divination project, a brief introduction to divination, as well as a shared practice. Led by poet and associate professor of English, Megan Kaminski.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Book Talk
7:00-8:00pm CDT Wednesday, April 21, 2021 Online
Presented by the Lawrence Public Library and Independence Inc.

Growing up as a paralyzed girl during the 90s and early 2000s, Rebekah Taussig only saw disability depicted as something monstrous (The Hunchback of Notre Dame), inspirational (Helen Keller), or angelic (Forrest Gump). None of this felt right; and as she got older, she longed for more stories that allowed disability to be complex and ordinary, uncomfortable and fine, painful and fulfilling.

In Sitting Pretty she writes about the rhythms and textures of what it means to live in a body that doesn’t fit. Rebekah reflects on everything from the complications of kindness and charity, living both independently and dependently, experiencing intimacy, and how the pervasiveness of ableism in our everyday media directly translates to everyday life.

Disability affects all of us, directly or indirectly, at one point or another. By exploring this truth in poignant and lyrical essays, Taussig illustrates the need for more stories and more voices to understand the diversity of humanity. Sitting Pretty challenges us as a society to be patient and vigilant, practical and imaginative, kind and relentless, as we set to work to write an entirely different story.

Rebekah Taussig, Ph.D. is a Kansas City writer and teacher with her doctorate in Creative Nonfiction and Disability Studies. She has led workshops and presentations at the University of Michigan, University of Kansas, and Davidson College on disability representation, identity, and community. She is also the recipient of the Hefner Heitz Kansas Book Award in Literary Nonfiction for Sitting Pretty. The award is sponsored by the Center for Kansas Studies, the Thomas Fox Averill Kansas Studies Collection at Mabee Library and the Friends of Mabee Library. You can find Taussig on Instagram @sitting_pretty.

Hannah Soyer is a queer disabled writer and MFA candidate in Creative Writing at the University of Kansas. She is the founder of This Body is Worthy, a project aimed at celebrating bodies outside of mainstream societal ideals, and Words of Reclamation, a space for disabled writers.

Link to Zoom Webinar.

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