Event Archive

Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Workshop
11:30am-1:00pm Tuesday, January 18, 2022 Online
Hosted by the KU Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, in partnership with the Organizational Improvement Office at the University of Kansas Medical Center

In this first session of a two-part workshop, you will learn about your individual strengths and how to apply those in collaborative settings. Led by Jane Hughes, Director of Professional Development and Engagement in the Organizational Improvement Office, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Lecture, The Future University
10:20am CT Thursday, January 13, 2022 Online
The Engaged Leaders Speaker Series is presented by the KU Libraries and The Commons. This event is presented in conjunction with the Community Engaged Learning Summit, hosted by the Center for Service Learning.

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan; a position that holds joint appointments in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business and the School for Environment & Sustainability. His research uses organizational behavior models and theories to understand the cultural and institutional aspects of environmental issues for organizations.

His 2021 book, The Engaged Scholar: Expanding the Impact of Academic Research in Today's World (Stanford University Press) argues for the emergence of a more publicly and politically engaged scholar. The Engaged Scholar is a call to make the path toward public engagement more acceptable and legitimate for the academic scholar in today's world.

The Engaged Leaders Speaker Series brings the voices of leading scholars to KU to offer prompts and host conversations that emphasize open, equitable, divergent, and critical thinking posed to guide the future university. This series combines the institutional priorities of Jayhawks Rising by illuminating the work and structure of higher education through research & discovery, with an eye toward “Healthy & Vibrant Communities,” which depends on the well-being of students, faculty, and staff who make up the many communities within KU and of which KU is a part.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Lecture, Public Event, Research Communication
5:30-7:30pm CT Wednesday, December 8, 2021 Online
Presented by the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative (HHARC), the Multidisciplinary Advocate and Research Group (MARG) , and The Commons

Digital Storytelling is a mode for presenting information that relies on technology to convey a multi-modal message. It is especially beneficial at the intersection of health and arts/humanities research, because its use of imagery and narrative offer a relatable style and emotive elements. This introductory session for Digital Storytelling will offer techniques for interviewing, storyboarding, basic cinematography, audio recording, video editing, and present recommendations for basic equipment to use.

Katina Bitsicas is a new media artist who utilizes video, photography, and performance in her art works. She uses these mediums to explore personal loss and trauma and the theme of bringing back to life, while the afterlife is still looming near. She has exhibited worldwide, including The Armory Show in New York, PULSE Art Fair in Miami Beach, Superchief Gallery NFT in New York, the Wheaton Biennial curated by Legacy Russell, HereArt in New York, Art in Odd Places in Orlando, Digital Graffiti Festival in Alys Beach, FL, and the St. Louis International Film Festival. She received her BA from Kalamazoo College, Post-Bacc from SACI in Florence, Italy, and MFA from the University of South Florida. She is an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Digital Storytelling at the University of Missouri, where she also conducts research with the MU School of Medicine on utilizing digital storytelling as a meaning-making intervention for bereaved family members.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Care & Well-being, Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Humans in a More Than Human World
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, December 2, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, the Spencer Museum of Art, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; with support from the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Environmental Studies Program.

In an era of accelerating crisis, how might we “come back down to Earth” and collectively embrace limits in ways that help us build more caring, just, and sustainable communities? Our human abilities, knowledge, and lives are limited, yet we have the
chance to learn. And as a society we need to learn to respect and live within the ecological limits of the planet. Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of Ecosphere Studies at The Land Institute, will lead a session exploring questions and practices around limits, sufficiency, creative learning, and care. Streit Krug’s recent articles include “Ecospheric Care Work” and “A Social Perennial Vision.”

Link to Zoom Registration.

Discussion, Faculty Event, Student Event
12:00-1:00pm CT Wednesday, December 1, 2021 Online
Presented by The Commons, the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity, the Center for Service Learning, and the KU Civic Engagement Ambassadors.

This series features experts on different aspects of US democracy and centers opportunities for civic engagement. Programs in this series feature experts from across campus, as well as specialists beyond the University. In Part IX: 2020 Student Voting Rates & Trends at KU, Kate Kemper, Assistant Director at the Center for Service Learning, will share data and implications on KU student voting rates in 2020.

  • What is the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE)?
  • How has KU student voter turnout changed in the last four years?
  • What can campus and community partners do to support student voting in the 2022 mid-term election?
  • How does KU partner with other institutions and national organizations to promote student voter engagement

Please contact csl@ku.edu if you need assistance.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Workshop
1:00-3:00pm CT Tuesday, November 30, 2021 Online
Supported by the Kansas African Studies Center, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, and The Commons

Join us for this two-part workshop that brings together perspectives from the medical humanities and inquiry-based practices for looking at art and objects. Guided by facilitators Kamna Balhara, Shari Tishman, and Corinne Zimmermann, participants will engage in deep observation, listening, and metacognitive reflection — all grounded in historical and contemporary images that can help reveal the ways we observe, construct narratives, and make judgments about the bodies of others.

The workshop is open to practitioners from all disciplines with any level of familiarity with its themes. A primary goal is to offer participants inquiry-based observational strategies that they can use in diverse contexts of teaching and learning, within and beyond the themes of the Chronic Conditions seminar.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, November 19, 2021 The Commons / Online

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, to reveal overlaps and connections across areas of interesting and methodological approaches. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features researchers, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, the University will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration. 

COVID Modifications:
In an effort to be responsive to changing health/safety protocol, Red Hot Research will be held in the main space of The Commons, with limited seating. Refreshments will be provided.

Presenters:
Hipatia Medina (she/her/ella), Spanish and Portuguese, border studies / estudios fronterizos, frontera / borderlands, violencia / violence, religion / religion, cotidianidad / cotidianity
Fernando Santos (he/him/his/él), Spanish and Portuguese, Jargon, Accent, Caribbean, Spanish, Language, Dialect, Regionalism
Sandra León (she/her/ella), Spanish and Portuguese, Huelga Bananera 1934 / Banana Strike 1834, Limón, Costa Rica, Agresiones Racistas / Racist aggressions, Derechos Laborales / Labor Rights, Movimientos Sociales / Social Movements
Lena Mose, American Studies (they/them/theirs), Digital Humanities, Archives, Chicana Feminism, Student Activism, Latinx

Emcee: Sylvia Fernandez (she/her/hers), IDRH/The Commons

To attend this event virtually, register at this Zoom Registration Link.

Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Meeting
11:00-11:45am CT Thursday, November 18, 2021 Online

HHARC Collaborative Seed Grants offer up to $3,500 toward support for launching research at the intersection of health, arts/humanities, and community partnership.

Learn about the goals for this Seed Grant funding initiative. Bring questions to learn more about how to apply.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Workshop
1:00-3:00pm CT Thursday, November 18, 2021 Online
Supported by the Kansas African Studies Center, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, and The Commons

Join us for this two-part workshop that brings together perspectives from the medical humanities and inquiry-based practices for looking at art and objects. Guided by facilitators Kamna Balhara, Shari Tishman, and Corinne Zimmermann, participants will engage in deep observation, listening, and metacognitive reflection — all grounded in historical and contemporary images that can help reveal the ways we observe, construct narratives, and make judgments about the bodies of others.

The workshop is open to practitioners from all disciplines with any level of familiarity with its themes. A primary goal is to offer participants inquiry-based observational strategies that they can use in diverse contexts of teaching and learning, within and beyond the themes of the Chronic Conditions seminar.

Link to Zoom Registration.
 

 

Discussion, Student Event
Language as Culture
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, November 18, 2021 Online
Presented by the KU First Nations Student Association and The Commons

Dr. Joe Brewer, Director, Indigenous Studies Program / Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Program
Dr. Ignacio Carvajal, Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese / Affiliate Faculty, Indigenous Studies Program

“To become native to this place, if we are to survive here, and our neighbors too, our work is to learn to speak the grammar of animacy, so that we might truly be at home.”
Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

How do you communicate with the more than human species around you?
What limitations and possibilities do our languages offer our understandings?

Robert “Nokwsi” Hicks, Jr. will begin this event with a prayer song. In discussion, we will then  consider how language is learned and shared across species, and how words shape our understanding. Following this introduction, participants may share from their own practices for deep listening and immersive learning through language.

Community Learning & Practice is presented by KU First Nations Student Association and The Commons to offer space for building understanding around topics resonating with researchers at KU and in public life in 2021. These sessions lead with Indigenous values and practice, including reciprocity, relationship, and reconciliation.

Link to Zoom Registration.

 

 

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