Event Archive

Panel
7:00-8:30pm Thursday, February 28, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Hall Center for the Humanities and The Commons

Join us for a discussion featuring experts whose work with microbial populations, such as those used for fermentation, includes scientific research, food production, artistic possibility. Free and open to the public.

 

 

Sandor Katz, food writer and activist
S.E. Nash, artist
Josie Chandler, Dept. of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas

Sandor Katz the Hall Center for the Humanities Interdisciplinary Scholar in Residence. He is a food writer, DIY food activist, and author, based in Tennessee. He experiments widely with fermentation, encourages at-home exploration, and promotes the consumption of live-culture foods. Katz extols the health virtues of fermented foods, which he personally uses as part of his treatment for AIDS. His 2012 book,The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World, received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. In 2014, he received the Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Public Event
7:00pm Tuesday, February 26, 2019 Lawrence Public Library
Supported by the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Lawrence Public Library, and The Commons

Sandor Katz is the Hall Center for the Humanities' Interdisciplinary Scholar in Residence. He is a food writer, DIY food activist, and author, based in Tennessee. He experiments widely with fermentation, encourages at-home exploration, and promotes the consumption of live-culture foods. Katz extols the health virtues of fermented foods, which he personally uses as part of his treatment for AIDS. His 2012 book, The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World, received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. In 2014, he received the Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Sandor Katz will speak about his work in microbial realms and what drives his passion for fermented foods. Conversation with the audience will follow. Free and open to the public.

Panel
3:30-5:00pm Thursday, February 21, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs

A workshop for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This panel discussion and Q&A will address questions of publishing in journals for graduate students in the social sciences and humanities.

  • How do you find the right journals?
  • How often and when should you accept opportunities to write book reviews?
  • What should I consider about open access journals?
     

Clarence Lang, PhD, Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; Professor of African and African-American Studies, American Studies
Ada Emmett, MLIS, Director of the KU Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright
Ludwin Molina, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Psychology

 

Framing the Dialogue
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, February 19, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Lawrence Talks!, and The Commons
 

Machismo is the term and “social construct” that upholds patriarchy and, at best, expects males worldwide (including in Latinx and Latin American communities) to be brave, courageous, and strong providers. At worst, machismo underlies a decades long pattern of male aggression and violence towards women and marginalized communities. In the era of #MeToo and #YoTambién, Charla de Merienda asks: as gender relations are redefined across the Americas, should machismo survive? Join us for a riveting conversation in which we share facts, discuss opinions, and build common ground on matters concerning all of us.

 

Panelists:

Verónica Garibotto, Spanish and Portuguese

Pere DeRoy, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Caio de Castro, Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Polo Camacho, Spencer Museum of Art

 

Charla de Merienda is a new collaborative series that carries forward the tradition of interdisciplinary discussion of research and current affairs in the Latin America and the Caribbean. Moderated by Lawrence Talks! Editor-in-chief, David Tamez, Charla de Merienda models critical debate through dialogue between members of the academy and community. The series is hosted at The Commons, a well-known space to engage with perspectives on broad topics and draw on diverse specializations and experiences. In collaboration, we bring people together to examine topics of national and local interest. Each discussion begins by examining facts to establish common ground, then guest speakers present prepared remarks (5-7 min), and a moderated community discussion follows. It is our hope that this model will raise awareness of the issues concerning the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States and be of interest to: All Ages, Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students.

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Tuesday, February 19, 2019, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, Tuesday, May 7, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:
• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Coffee @ The Commons, Framing the Dialogue
10:00-11:00am Thursday, February 14, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity and The Commons

Donna Zuckerberg is the author of Not All Dead White Men (Harvard University Press, 2018), which explores online communities of the far right to better understand why and where antifeminism is thriving online.  It examines virtual communities where men express fear about having lost privilege and power and strategize about how to reclaim them. Zuckerberg links this movement to ancient Greek and Latin texts, citing the model of masculinity they purport, as a way to preserve and protect men’s rights.

This Coffee @ The Commons event will focus on how scholars can and should respond to this kind of misogynist material when they encounter it.

Zuckerberg will give the Keynote address for KU Masculinities Month, "Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age," at 6pm on Wednesday, February 13 in the Burge Union, Forum A.

Framing the Dialogue, Public Event
7:00pm Tuesday, February 5, 2019 Liberty Hall
Supported by The Commons, The Raven Book Store, the Office of First-Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Fatimah Asghar is a nationally touring poet, performer, educator, and writer. Her work has appeared in POETRY Magazine, BuzzFeed Reader, Academy of American Poets and other publications. Her work has been featured on news outlets including PBS, NBC, Teen Vogue, Huffington Post, and others. In 2011, she created REFLEKS, a Spoken Word Poetry group in Bosnia and Herzegovina while on a Fulbright Scholarship studying theater in post-genocidal countries. She is a member of the Dark Noise collective and a Kundiman Fellow. Her chapbook After was released on Yes Yes Books fall 2015. She is the writer of Brown Girls, an Emmy-nominated web series that highlights a friendship between women of color. In 2017 she was the recipient of a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation and was on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list. Her debut collection of poems If They Come For Us was released via One World/Random House in August 2018. With Safia Elhillo, she is co-editor of the anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019).

Safia Elhillo is the author of The January Children (University of Nebraska Press, 2017) and holds an MFA in poetry from the New School. Safia is a Pushcart Prize nominee, and recipient of the 2015 Brunel International African Poetry Prize and the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, The Conversation, and Crescendo Literary and The Poetry Foundation’s Poetry Incubator. Safia’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in POETRY Magazine, Callaloo, and The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-day series, among others, and in anthologies including The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop and Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism. Her work has been translated into Arabi, Japanese, Estonian, and Greek, and has been commissioned by Under Armour and the Bavarian State Ballet. With Fatimah Asghar, she is co-editor of the anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019). Safia is of Sudanese origin and lives in Washington, DC.

This event connects to themes of making art as a form of activism, immigration, identity, and celebrating roots deeper than one country's borders can contain, and is presented in conjunction with the 2018-19 KU Common Book Create Dangerously, the Immigrant Artist at Work, by Edwidge Danticat.

Tickets are free and available here: https://www.universe.com/events/fatimah-asghar-and-safia-elhillo-tickets-lawrence-19BVWN.

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Tuesday, February 19, 2019, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, Tuesday, May 7, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:
• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Framing the Dialogue
12:00-1:30pm Friday, February 1, 2019 The Commons
Supported by: the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Lawrence Talks!, the Latin American Graduate Organization, and The Commons

The American Dream? A National Emergency? As the country is embroiled in a debate about immigration and national security, a subject that expressly concerns America’s identity and its values, this event will privilege facts, allow space for opinions, and build common ground on a topic that touches all of us. Charla de Merienda asks: what does it mean to be American? Who gets to define it? What would you do to “pass” as something you’re “not”?

 
Panelists:
Charles Olcese, KU International Student Services
Gibette Encarnacion, English
Raul Saenz, Molecular Biosciences
Karen Lisondra, Resonation Music and Arts, LLC
 
Charla de Merienda is a new collaborative series that carries forward the tradition of interdisciplinary discussion of research and current affairs in the Latin America and the Caribbean. Moderated by Lawrence Talks! Editor-in-chief, David Tamez, Charla de Merienda models critical debate through dialogue between members of the academy and community. The series is hosted at The Commons, a well-known space to engage with perspectives on broad topics and draw on diverse specializations and experiences. In collaboration, we bring people together to examine topics of national and local interest. Each discussion begins by examining facts to establish common ground, then guest speakers present prepared remarks (5-7 min), and a moderated community discussion follows. It is our hope that this model will raise awareness of the issues concerning the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States and be of interest to: All Ages, Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students.
Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue, Graduate Student Event, Student Event
12:00-1:00pm Tuesday, January 29, 2019, Wednesday, January 30, 2019, Thursday, January 31, 2019 The Commons
Supported by The Commons, The Raven Book Store, the Office of First-Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Brown Girls is a web series, which focuses on the lives and friendship of Leila and Patricia, two young women of color who come from vastly different backgrounds. Viewers are introduced to a cadre of characters as the friends traverse the city of Chicago in pursuit of their life goals.

The show is written by Fatimah Asghar, a nationally touring poet, performer, educator, and writer, whose work has been featured in many journals and multiple news outlets. She will read from her most recent collection of poems, If They Come For Us (One World/Random House in August 2018) at Liberty Hall on February 5th, with Safia Elhillo, her co-editor of the forthcoming anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019). Brown Girls is directed and produced by Sam Bailey.

This series of screenings is offered for students and hosted by students. Each day will feature different episodes of the series. Students are invited to attend one, two, or all three screening events.

Pages