Event Archive

Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue
6:00-8:00pm Wednesday, April 4, 2018 Spencer Museum of Art, Auditorium

Sponsored by The Commons and the Spencer Museum of Art

In Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s subversive romantic comedy "Ali: Fear Eats the Soul" (1974), a lonely widow (Brigitte Mira) meets a young man (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar. Wielding the romantic power of classic Hollywood melodrama, the film also exposes racial tensions underlying contemporary German culture. This film is screened in conjunction with the public art project Pledges of Allegiance. Running time: 93 min. Not Rated. German and Arabic with English subtitles.

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00 am Tuesday, April 3, 2018 The Commons

Shut up and writeSupported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

  • committed, condensed time to write, and
  • built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Book Talk, Framing the Dialogue
7:00pm Tuesday, April 3, 2018 Liberty Hall

Supported by the Raven Bookstore, the Department of English, the Department of American Studies, the Department of African & African-American Studies, the Langston Hughes Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, The Office of Diversity and Equity, the Hall Center for the Humanities, The Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, KU Libraries, The Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, The Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, The Project on the History of Black Writing, and The Commons

Danez Smith's work as a black and queer poet, transcends arbitrary boundaries to present work that grips, dismantles oppressive constructs, and strikes on the human heart. Often centered around intersections of race, class, sexuality, faith, and social justice -- Smith uses rhythm, fierce raw power, and imagery to re-imagine the world as they take it apart.

Recipient of 2017 NEA award for poetry, Smith has performed on stages abroad & all over the US; recently they were a featured performer on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Their work has been published widely on platforms including Poetry Magazine, Beloit Poetry Journal, Blavity, Buzzfeed, and Ploughshares. Smith is the 2016 winner of the Kate Tufts Poetry Award, 2016 Hopwood Awardee, and winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. Smith’s second full-length collection, Don't Call Us Dead, was be published by Graywolf Press in September of 2017.

Graduate Student Event, Red Hot Research
4:00 pm Friday, March 30, 2018 The Commons

Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

Framing the Dialogue
Thursday, March 29, 2018 The Commons

Shawn Alexander, African and African-American Studies/Langston Hughes Center Etienne Thomas, Kansas Athletics Mauricio Gómez Montoya, Jayhawk Student One Stop 12:00pm Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Commons Supported by the University Honors Program, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Achievement and Assessment Institute, and The Commons

How does whiteness appear in the realm of college sports, and specifically, within the NCAA? How do these issues present themselves nationally? How do we see them play out locally? Join us for this conversation with scholars. For additional reading, see “The NCAA as Modern Jim Crow? A Sports Historian Explains Why She Drew the Parallel” in The Chronicle of Higher Education, 01/12/2018.

Performance
Theater performance by Claudia Stevens
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 28, 2018 Spooner Hall
Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue
5:30 pm & 7:15 pm Wednesday, March 14, 2018 Liberty Hall

Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. In 1965, Wendell Berry returned home to Henry County, where he bought a small farm house and began a life of farming, writing and teaching. This lifelong relationship with the land and community would come to form the core of his prolific writings. A half century later Henry County, like many rural communities across America, has become a place of quiet ideological struggle. In the span of a generation, the agrarian virtues of simplicity, land stewardship, sustainable farming, local economies and rootedness to place have been replaced by a capital-intensive model of industrial agriculture characterized by machine labor, chemical fertilizers, soil erosion and debt--all of which have frayed the fabric of rural communities. Writing from a long wooden desk beneath a forty-paned window, Berry has watched this struggle unfold, becoming one its most passionate and eloquent voices in defense of agrarian life. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, Look & See blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry's agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film--a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it.

Dolores profiles Dolores Huerta, one of the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century-and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one's life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt.

Tickets for the evening are available here: https://www.universe.com/events/double-screening-look-see-a-portrait-of-wendell-berry-dolores-tickets-lawrence-LJWCDF?ref=universe-discover

Co-sponsored by: the KU Environmental Studies Program, the Department of American Studies, the Department of Sociology, the Center for Sustainability, the KU Natural History Museum, and The Commons
Coffee @ The Commons, Framing the Dialogue
RaMell Ross, Photographer/Filmmaker/Writer
10:00am Friday, March 9, 2018 The Commons

Supported by the Hallmark Lecture Series, the Department of Design, and The Commons

RaMell RossRoss brings a lyrical magnifying glass to the history of South Alabama. His work interrogates aesthetic frameworks that constrict the expression of African Americans, often employing the integrity of social documentation and currency of stereotypical imagery.

Ross’s photographs have been exhibited internationally, and his writing has appeared in the New York Times among other outlets. His first feature documentary, Hale County This Morning, This Evening, presents bold innovation to the form of portraiture in cinema and was awarded the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Creative Vision at Sundance Film Festival 2018.

Ross earned a BA in both English & Sociology at Georgetown University and an MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design. He currently teaches in the Visual Arts Department at Brown University.

Artist Talk
Linda Weintraub, Eco-Artist & Writer
4:00 pm Thursday, March 8, 2018 The Commons

What is the fate of Earth’s living systems? Linda Weintraub will present the ecological implications of seven archetypes as they are expressed by contemporary artists.

A reception will follow the talk, in the Kansas Union Gallery.

Sponsored by the Department of Visual Art; the Environmental Studies Program; the KU Natural History Museum; the Spencer Museum of Art; The Land Institute and Ecosphere Studies Initiative; the Center for Sustainability; the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; the School of the Arts; the Department of Geology; the Earth, Energy, and Environment Center; and The Commons
Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00 am Tuesday, March 6, 2018 The Commons

Shut up and writeSupported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

  • committed, condensed time to write, and
  • built-in feedback from peers


It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

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