Event Archive

Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue, Public Event
6:00-7:30pm Thursday, January 31, 2019 The Commons
Supported by The Commons, The Raven Book Store, the Office of First-Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Brown Girls is a web series, which focuses on the lives and friendship of Leila and Patricia, two young women of color who come from vastly different backgrounds. Viewers are introduced to a cadre of characters as the friends traverse the city of Chicago in pursuit of their life goals.

The show is written by Fatimah Asghar, a nationally touring poet, performer, educator, and writer, whose work has been featured in many journals and multiple news outlets. She will read from her most recent collection of poems, If They Come For Us (One World/Random House in August 2018) at Liberty Hall on February 5th, with Safia Elhillo, her co-editor of the forthcoming anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019). Brown Girls is directed and produced by Sam Bailey. 

Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue, Graduate Student Event, Student Event
12:00-1:00pm Tuesday, January 29, 2019, Wednesday, January 30, 2019, Thursday, January 31, 2019 The Commons
Supported by The Commons, The Raven Book Store, the Office of First-Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Brown Girls is a web series, which focuses on the lives and friendship of Leila and Patricia, two young women of color who come from vastly different backgrounds. Viewers are introduced to a cadre of characters as the friends traverse the city of Chicago in pursuit of their life goals.

The show is written by Fatimah Asghar, a nationally touring poet, performer, educator, and writer, whose work has been featured in many journals and multiple news outlets. She will read from her most recent collection of poems, If They Come For Us (One World/Random House in August 2018) at Liberty Hall on February 5th, with Safia Elhillo, her co-editor of the forthcoming anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019). Brown Girls is directed and produced by Sam Bailey.

This series of screenings is offered for students and hosted by students. Each day will feature different episodes of the series. Students are invited to attend one, two, or all three screening events.

Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue, Graduate Student Event, Student Event
12:00-1:00pm Tuesday, January 29, 2019, Wednesday, January 30, 2019, Thursday, January 31, 2019 The Commons
Supported by The Commons, The Raven Book Store, the Office of First-Year Experience, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Brown Girls is a web series, which focuses on the lives and friendship of Leila and Patricia, two young women of color who come from vastly different backgrounds. Viewers are introduced to a cadre of characters as the friends traverse the city of Chicago in pursuit of their life goals.

The show is written by Fatimah Asghar, a nationally touring poet, performer, educator, and writer, whose work has been featured in many journals and multiple news outlets. She will read from her most recent collection of poems, If They Come For Us (One World/Random House in August 2018) at Liberty Hall on February 5th, with Safia Elhillo, her co-editor of the forthcoming anthology Halal If You Hear Me (Haymarket Books, 2019). Brown Girls is directed and produced by Sam Bailey.

This series of screenings is offered for students and hosted by students. Each day will feature different episodes of the series. Students are invited to attend one, two, or all three screening events.

Kenneth A. Spencer Lecture
Jose Antonio Vargas, Journalist, Filmmaker, Immigrant Rights Advocate
7:00pm Thursday, January 24, 2019 Liberty Hall

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and a leading voice for the human rights of immigrants. He is a founder and chief executive officer of Define American, the nation’s leading nonprofit media organization that fights injustice and anti-immigrant hate through the power of storytelling. He is the author of the memoir, Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, published by HarperCollins in 2018.

In 2011, the New York Times Magazine published a groundbreaking essay by Vargas in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. A year later, he appeared on the cover of TIME magazine worldwide with fellow undocumented immigrants in a follow-up cover story. He then produced a directed Documented, a documentary feature film on his undocumented experience. Broadcasted on CNN and streamed on Netflix, the film received a 2015 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Documentary. In 2015, MTV aired White People, an Emmy-nominated television special he produced and directed on what it means to be young and white in a demographically changing America.

Tickets are available at no cost: https://www.universe.com/events/jose-antonio-vargas-tickets-lawrence-1FJ305/manage

Film Screening, Framing the Dialogue
7:00-9:00pm Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Lawrence Public Library
Sponsored by: the Kenneth A. Spencer Lecture Fund, The Commons at KU, The College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, the KU Office of Research, Lawrence Interfaith Refugee and Immigrant Ministry, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Lawrence Public Library

On January 24, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas will give the annual Kenneth A. Spencer Lecture for The Commons at the University of Kansas. His talk will be at 7:00pm at Liberty Hall. In anticipation of this event, The Commons is co-hosting events in conjunction with his upcoming visit.

In 2011, Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in the New York Times Magazine. Documented chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his public struggle as an immigration reform activist/provocateur; and his journey inward as he reconnects with his mother, whom he hasn't seen in 20 years. A broken immigration system leads to broken families and broken lives.

Before showing Documented, we will screen a short film made by KU students, that features local immigration stories.

 

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, December 4, 2018 The Commons

Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut up & Write TuesdaysShut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers committed, condensed time to write, and built-in feedback from peers.

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Coffee @ The Commons, Framing the Dialogue
on Memory and Cultural Hybrid Identity
10:00am-11:00am Friday, November 30, 2018 The Commons
Supported by the Photography Program in the Department of Design and The Commons

Kambli began her career in 1993 at age 18 after emigrating to the States. The death of her parents, her experience as a migrant, and her photographic inheritance
have consistently informed her work. She received the Book Award through PhotoLucinda’s Critical Mass for her 2010 series Color Falls Down, which was inspired by the questions Kavi, her son, asked at age three. Biculturality and being bilingual influence Kambli’s work to this day.

She is a professor of art at Truman State University in Kirksville, MO.

Priya Kambli will speak at 6:00pm on November 29 in Budig Hall, as part of the Hallmark Symposium Lecture Series.

 

 

Framing the Dialogue, Public Event, The Future University
11:30am-1:00pm Friday, November 30, 2018 The Commons
Supported by the Project on the History of Black Writing and The Commons


A celebration of the poet Ntozake Shange. Presentations, followed by audience reading of Shange’s famous choreopoem, “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/ When the Rainbow is Enuf.”

Darren Canady, English/Hall Center for the Humanities Faculty Fellow
Maryemma Graham, English/Project on the History of Black Writing
Nicole Hodges-Persley, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
 

Dialogue, Discussion, Framing the Dialogue
5:30-7:00pm Thursday, November 29, 2018 The Commons
Supported by the Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Lawrence Talks!, and The Commons

A new style for the traditional CLACS merienda, which centers a topic in Latin America and the Caribbean informed by current affairs and research across disciplines. Charla de Merienda is hosted with The Commons and models critical debate, moderated by Lawrence Talks! co-founder David Tamez.

Featured speakers:

Caio De Castro, Spanish & Portuguese
Rafael Martins, Philosophy
Laura Herlihy, Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Prior to the event, read the speakers’ statements on the Lawrence Talks! blog: https://www.lawrencetalks.org/charla-de-merienda

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, November 20, 2018 The Commons

Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut up & Write TuesdaysShut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers committed, condensed time to write, and built-in feedback from peers.

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

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