Event Archive

Red Hot Research
4:00 pm Friday, March 2, 2018 The Commons

Red hot researchRed Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Book Talk, Framing the Dialogue
Hanif Abudurraqib | Poet, TV Writer, Essayist, Music & Culture Critic
7:00 pm Tuesday, February 27, 2018 Liberty Hall

Hanif AbdurraqibHanif Abdurraqib is a poet, writer, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. With Big Lucks, Hanif released a limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, in Summer 2017. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow and previously worked for MTV News, where he wrote about the intersections of music, culture, and identity. Hanif also wrote the 2016 live shows: MTV Video Music Awards and VH1’s Unsilent Night. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, was one of 2016's best-selling poetry books and was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. Hanif's debut collection of essays titled, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was published in November 2017 via Two Dollar Radio. He is a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve L. Ewing.

Tickets: https://www.universe.com/events/hanif-abdurraqib-reading-signing-tickets-lawrence-FLH123?ref=uniiverse-transactional_emailer-host_posted_listing

​Supported by the Raven Bookstore, the Department of English, the Department of American Studies, the Department of African & African-American Studies, the Langston Hughes Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, The Office of Diversity and Equity, the Hall Center for the Humanities, and The Commons

Framing the Dialogue
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 The Commons

A conversation about the meaning and history of ‘whiteness,’ and how it functions in the U.S. today, led by: David Roediger, American Studies Cécile Accilien, African & African-American Studies/Institute of Haitian Studies Dave Tell, Communication Studies Ami Nanavaty, American Studies & Microbiology, Honors Student

Sponsored by the University Honors Program, the Achievement & Assessment Institute, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of First-Year Experience, and The Commons.

Unpacking WhitenessWhite people in the U.S. have so long dominated, in terms of numbers and power, that their racial identity does not get named or discussed. Too often, studying race means only studying people of color, despite powerful traditions of naming whiteness as a problem by Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Asian-American thinkers. This event will explore the meaning, history, and functions of ‘whiteness.’ For background, see “The First White President,” an essay by Ta-Nehisi Coates in the October 2017 issue of The Atlantic.

A brownbag lunch discussion with KU scholars. Coffee and sweets provided.

Activity
In association with Pledges of Allegiance
1:00 pm Saturday, February 24, 2018 Lawrence Public Library

The Art Cart is presented at the Lawrence Public Library for a special collaboration designed for participants of all ages. Inspired by the ongoing Pledges of Allegiance public art project, this activity will allow all participants to create their own flags inspired by a selection of Mr. Browne’s precepts from the book Wonder by R.J. Palacio and examples of flags from the Pledges of Allegiance public art project on view outside Spooner Hall, as well as draft a personal pledge articulating what it stands for.

Sponsored by The Commons, Lawrence Public Library, Spencer Museum of Art

Graduate Student Event, Red Hot Research
4:00 pm Friday, February 23, 2018 The Commons

Red hot graduate researchRed Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

Presenters:
Anna Klompen, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Diversity of Jellyfish Venoms
Igor Ristić, Communication Studies, Experiencing Culture Shock? Watch TV
Nicholas Natchoo, Curriculum and Teaching, Creolizing the Curriculum
Brian Trump, History, Narratives of Sexual Violence
Alysha Griffin, Theatre, Richard B. Harrison Before Broadway
 

Book Launch & Scene Burst, Framing the Dialogue
7:00 pm Wednesday, February 21, 2018 The Commons

Join us as we put two complementary yet distinctive mediums in conversation with each other in our collaborative book launch and scene burst. Using excerpts from Professor Subini Annamma’s Book “The Pedagogy of Pathologization” and scenes from Professor Darren Canady’s play “Black Butterflies”, the audience will engage the ways girls of color are labeled defiant, disobedient and disabled within a carceral state. Following the readings, there will be a community discussion with both professors and the actors on how they experience and resist systemic inequities uniquely facing multiply-marginalized girls of color.

Supported by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Langston Hughes Center, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Disability Studies Program, and The Commons

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00 am Tuesday, February 20, 2018 The Commons

Shut up and writeSupported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

  • committed, condensed time to write, and
  • built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Performance
E. Patrick Johnson
7:30 pm Tuesday, February 20, 2018 Elizabeth Sherbon Black-Box Theatre, Robinson Center

This dramatic reading is based on the oral histories collected in Johnson's book, Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South--An Oral History. The oral histories are from black gay men who were born, raised, and continue to live in the South and range in age from 19-93.

E. Patrick Johnson is the chair of African American Studies, Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies, and African American Studies at Northwestern University.

The performance will last approximately 70 minutes with no intermission.

Sponsored by the Departments of African and African-American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Dance, English, Sociology, Theatre, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; the University Honors Program; KU Libraries; the Office of Diversity and Equity; the Office of the Chancellor; the Office of the Provost; the Spencer Museum of Art; and The Commons

Faculty Event, Red Hot Research
4:00 pm Friday, February 9, 2018 The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Genelle Belmas, Journalism
Tanya Hartman, Visual Art
Dave Tell, Communication Studies
Kimber Richter, Preventative Medicine & Public Health
Maria Orive, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Emcee: Emily Ryan, The Commons
 

Undergraduate Student Event
Presented by the Center for Undergraduate Research
4:30 pm Thursday, February 8, 2018 The Commons

Rock Chalk Talks is a monthly event for undergraduate students that will put a handful of undergraduate researchers in the spotlight for approximately 6 minutes while they each present their research and talk about certain topics of the month. Included in each event:

  • Undergraduate researchers will present their work while focusing on a theme
  • A competitive trivia game after each presentation on the research that was just shared
  • Prizes for the winners of the trivia game
  • A social hour with snacks and friends

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