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Programs and Events

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Precision Medicine Using Circulating Markers: A New Paradigm for Managing Complex Diseases Enabled by Mixed-scale Mechanical Systems

Steve Soper, Professor of Chemistry, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
3:00pm Thursday, August 27 | The Commons
Supported by the Office of the Provost

The major focus of Soper's researcg group is to generate new tools for discovery and medical diagnostics through the analysis of biological macromolecules including DNAs, RNAs, and proteins. These tools cover a diverse range of activities, such as the generation of new reagents, novel assays and methodologies, and hardware innovations across various length scales (millimeter to nanometer). These tools are being integrated into operating systems that can be used for a variety of applications, such as the diagnosis and prognosis of many forms of cancers, stroke, and infectious diseases.

Soper earned a BS in psychology from the University of Nebraska, a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and a Ph.D. in bioanalytical Chemistry from the University of Kansas.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH:
Water, Energy, Climate

4:00pm Friday, August 28 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Rex Buchanan, Kansas Geological Survey
Dorothy Daley, Public Affairs & Administration / Environmental Studies Program
Shannon O’Lear, Geography
Phillip Drake, English
Greg Ludvigson, Kansas Geological Survey

Emcee:
Travis Weller, Institute for Policy & Social Research

ARTIST TALK

Rohini Devasher

5:30pm Thursday, September 10 | The Commons
Supported by the Spencer Museum of Art

Delhi-based artist Rohini Devasher discusses her multi-disciplinary practice, which explores the interface between science and the visual arts. In late 2016, Devasher will return to the Spencer Museum to complete a commission for the exhibition Temporal Turn: Art and Speculation in Contemporary Asia.

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Jim Dumesic, Steenbock Chair and Michel Boudart Professor University of Wisconsin - Madison

3:30pm Monday, September 14 | The Commons
Supported by the Office of the Provost

Throughout his career, Dumesic has used spectroscopic, microcalorimetric, and reaction kinetics techniques to study the surface and dynamic properties of heterogeneous catalysts. He pioneered the field of microkinetic analysis, in which diverse information from experimental and theoretical studies is combined to elucidate the essential surface chemistry that controls catalyst performance. He has received a variety of awards and honors in the field of catalysis and chemical engineering, including the inaugural Heinz Heinemann Award by the International Association of Catalysis Societies, and awards from the American Chemical Society, the North American Catalysis Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

PERFORMANCE

Naaxiin Textiles

Evelyn Vanderhoop, accompanied by Gloria Burns
7:00pm Tuesday, September 15 | The Commons
Supported by the Spencer Museum of Art

In this performance and discussion, renowned Haida artist Evelyn Vanderhoop speaks about naaxiin textiles, an indigenous weaving tradition of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and performs a traditional dance to unveil a naaxiin robe she has recently completed. Vanderhoop’s niece, Gloria Burns, accompanies the performance with Haida drumming and singing.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH:
Data Visualization

4:00pm Friday, September 18 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

PERFORMANCE

An Evening of Indian Music in Two Parts

The Art of Improvisation (Purnaprajna Bangere with Amit Kavthekar);
Melting Boundaries: A Musical Dialogue between East and West (Purnaprajna Bangere, Amit Kavthekar, and Jeff Harshbarger)

7:00pm Thursday, September 24 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities and The Commons

Purnaprajna Bangere studied at an important school of violin players in India. He had rigorous training under the well known south Indian violinist and a teacher of great repute HKN Murthy. HKN Murthy is the student of the legendary Indian musician M. S. Gopalakrishnan. Purnaprajna is a representative of his school, and plays the style of music known as the Parur style, characterized by high technical virtuosity and musicianship. In the last two years, he has been invited to give solo recitals in the prestigious music festivals such as the Learnquest music festival in Boston, the Cleveland Music festival and the Toronto Music festival.

Amit Kavthekar has rhythm running in his veins. At the early age of six, he was groomed in the art of tabla playing by Maestro Ustad Allarakha. Since 1991, he has been taught tabla intricacies by Ustad Zakir Hussain, a master maestro of Tabla. Amit has played with some of the major musicians of Indian classical music that includes, Ustad Shahid Parvez, Pt. Shivkumar Sharma and Pt. Jasraj. Currently, Amit is teaching Tabla in New England School of Music which is based in Boston.

Jeff Harshbarger was voted 2011 Person of the Year by Plasticsax.com and Best Bassist by Pitch Magazine, Jeff Harshbarger has had quite an eclectic career. A prolific composer and bandleader in his own right, Jeff has recorded and performed across the globe with varied artists of repute. He is a co-founder of Tzigane Music, an artist-run collective and record label, and is the curator of Jeff Harshbarger Presents: An Alternative Jazz Series, promoting new improvised music in Kansas City. Jeff also hosts Jazz in the Afternoon on Wenesdays from 1-3 pm on 90.1 FM KKFI.

LECTURE

States of Surveillance

7:30pm Thursday, October 1 | The Commons
Alessandro Acquisti, Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University
Sponsored by the Institute for Policy & Social Research, and offered in conjunction with the Symposium on Surveillance beginning the following day.

Dr. Alessandro Acquisti investigates the economics of privacy. His studies have investigated privacy and disclosure behavior in online social networks, and the application of behavioral economics to the study of privacy and information security decision making. Dr. Acquisti is Professor of Information Technology and Public Policy at the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University and an Andrew Carnegie Fellow (inaugural class). He is also co-director of CMU Center for Behavioral Decision Research and a member of the CMU Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory, of CMU CyLab, and of the National Academies' Committee on public response to alerts and warnings using social media and associated privacy considerations. Alessandro holds a PhD from UC Berkeley, and Master degrees from UC Berkeley, the London School of Economics, and Trinity College Dublin. While at Berkeley, he interned a Xerox PARC and Riacs, NASA Ames. He has held visiting positions at the Universities of Rome, Paris, Freiburg, Harvard, Chicago, Microsoft Research and Google. He has been a member of the National Academies' Committee on public response to alerts and warnings using social media, and has been a TED Global speaker. (http://blog.ted.com/the-battle-between-public-and-private-alessandro-acquisti-at-tedglobal-2013)

LECTURE

Protecting the Vote: Dialogues on Citizenship, Elections, and the Franchise

Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State
5:30pm Thursday, October 8 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Langston Hughes Center, the Department of Political Science, the Department of African and African-American Studies, and the School of Public Affairs & Administration

Fifty years after the passage and ratification of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 the symposium, Protecting the Vote: Dialogues on Citizenship, Elections, and the Franchise, will examine election law conflicts and politics in America. Discussions will address the requirements of voting, including registration, voter identification laws and early/absentee voting laws. Attention will also be given to the mechanical and logistical issues of voting, including lines at the polls and provisional ballots. The title of symposium reflects the tension between protecting against corruption at the polls and protecting the individual's right to vote.

Participants will include Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and number of the key historians, political scientists and public policy scholars working on the issues of voting rights.

This keynote lecture is presented in conjunction with a day-long workshop at the Hall Center for the Humanities.

Langston Hughes Visiting Professor Lecture

Omar Gudino, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Denver

3:30pm Wednesday, October 14 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Omar Gudino directs the Services for At-Risk Youth & Families (SAYF) Lab, which conducts research on patterns of risk and resilience in youth exposed to trauma; the development and dissemination of evidence-based treatments for maltreated youth; and unmet need for mental health services. In addition to conducting research, Dr. Gudino teaches an undergraduate course on abnormal psychology and serves as an undergraduate major advisor for psychology. Furthermore, he teaches graduate seminars on the psychological assessment of children; multicultural issues in mental health; and provides clinical training to doctoral students in the Child Clinical PhD Program. Dr. Gudino is a Board Certified Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychologist and a licensed psychologist in Colorado and New York.

The Langston Hughes Visiting Professorship was established at the University of Kansas in 1977 in honor of the African American poet, playwright and fiction writer who lived in Lawrence from 1903 to 1916. The Professorship brings a prominent or emerging minority scholar to the University for one semester each year. The Langston Hughes Professorship has been a valuable vehicle for bringing prominent minority scholars to the University for visiting appointments, as well as for recruiting permanent faculty.

LECTURE

Ecological Agriculture for an Ecological Civilization

Wes Jackson, Founder & President, The Land Institute
6:00pm Thursday, October 15 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Visual Art, the Department of Sociology, the Environmental Studies Program, and The Commons

EXHIBITION OPENING

The New American Farmer

7:00pm Friday, October 16 | The Commons

Presented with the support of a 2014 Starter Grant from The Commons, this exhibition is the culmination of a collaborative research project to document and empower the diversity of the new American farmer. This project, launched by KU Faculty members, D. Bryon Darby, Paul Stock, and Tim Hossler, tells the story of a new breed of farmer — the first-generation, small-scale, sustainable farmer.

HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City

Alice Goffman, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin
7:30pm Wednesday, October 21 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

Alice Goffman will examine the largely hidden world of police beatings, court fees, sentencing hearings, and low-level warrants that pervade daily life for young people in one poor black neighborhood in Philadelphia. By Goffman’s sophomore year in college, she had moved into the neighborhood she calls Sixth Street and befriended the young men caught up in court cases, probation and parole supervision, and low-level warrants.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH:
Food

4:00pm Friday, October 23 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

LANGSTON HUGHES VISITING PROFESSOR LECTURE

Alcides Velasquez, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia

3:30pm Wednesday, October 28 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Velasquez's research is focused on understanding social and political participatory uses of communication technologies, such as social media, and their individual and collective outcomes. In order to understand users’ online political and social behaviors, as well as the effects of these uses, for this research stream he uses a complex approach that incorporates the study of social, system design, and cognitive and social psychological factors.

The Langston Hughes Visiting Professorship was established at the University of Kansas in 1977 in honor of the African American poet, playwright and fiction writer who lived in Lawrence from 1903 to 1916. The Professorship brings a prominent or emerging minority scholar to the University for one semester each year. The Langston Hughes Professorship has been a valuable vehicle for bringing prominent minority scholars to the University for visiting appointments, as well as for recruiting permanent faculty.

FILM SCREENING & PANEL

Called to Walls

5:30pm Thursday, November 5 | The Commons
Sponsored by Student Union Activities

Called to Walls is a documentary film that features artist David Loewenstein as he paints murals in small towns to create beauty and instill a sense of community.

Out of view of the high art world and the hip gallery scene comes this heartening story of unlikely partners in middle America communities working together to reexamine their histories, celebrate what makes their towns unique, and imagine their futures in the form of giant murals at the center of their downtowns. Part road-movie, part inspirational small town drama, and part art documentary, this compelling film follows a Kansas artist, during a three year project around the heart of the U.S., helping to reignite a sense of civic pride and creative possibility in places often overlooked. A thoughtful and uplifting film that leaves viewers not only admiring the serious work and good will of this artist, but also with an itch to go out and do it themselves!

A panel discussion with the film's creators will follow the screening.

More information can be found on the film's website: http://www.calledtowalls.com/

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, November 13 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, December 4 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

The Great Barrier Reef: How Human Stories Matter

Iain McCalman, Professor, University of Sydney
7:30pm Wednesday, February 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

The acclaimed historian and explorer will take audiences on a new adventure into the Great Barrier Reef to reveal how our shifting perceptions of the natural world have shaped this extraordinary seascape.

HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

Human Trafficking in the Heartland

Hannah Britton, Associate Professor of Political Science and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, University of Kansas
7:30pm Tuesday, March 22 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

Hannah Britton is KU associate professor of political science and women, gender & sexuality studies as well as director of the Center for the Study of Injustice. In this role, she coordinates KU's Anti-Slavery and Human Trafficking Initiative, which is a working group of faculty and students engaged in teaching and research about slavery and trafficking. Her talk will focus on human trafficking in the heartland.