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Programs and Events

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, March 6 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Fengjun Li, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science, The Smart Grid and Privacy
Dan Reuman, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Hierarchical systems and synchrony in biology and other fields
Armin Schulz, Philosophy, The Evolution of Pscyhological Altruism
Meg Jamieson, Film & Media Studies, Collaborative Filmmaking and the Death of the Author
Joe Colistra, Architecture, Community Engagement, So what?!

Event Leader:
Lena Hileman, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

INFORMATION SESSION

Innovations at the Nexus of Food-Water-Energy: A New NSF-Funded Initiative

2:00-3:00pm Monday, March 9 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of Research

The National Science Foundation is developing a new research initiative starting this year-Innovations at the Nexus of Food-Energy-Water Systems (INFEWS). In FY15 they are committing about $5M to a range of activities that will help build a research community and define critical research challenges for coming program years. In the FY16 Budget Request, NSF is asking for $75M to begin full funding for the program-projected to run through 2021. image credit: Royal Geographical Society

LECTURE

To End All Wars: Looking Back on 1914-1918

Adam Hochschild, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California Berkeley
7:30pm Monday, March 9 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild will describe this in an illustrated talk based on his book: To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918. Hochschild's first book, Half the Way Home: A Memoir of Father and Son, was published in 1986, followed by The Mirror at Midnight: A South African Journey and The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin. King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa won the prestigious Mark Lynton History prize for literary style.

Book-signing and reception to follow.

SYMPOSIUM

Hybrid Practices in the Arts, Sciences, and Technology from the 1960s to Today

Tuesday, March 10 - Friday, March 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, The Kress Foundation Department of Art History, and The Commons

Supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art, this international conference explores three major aspects of hybrid artistic research: key hybrid projects from the past 50 years, including Experiments in Art & Technology (E.A.T.), Art & Technology (A&T), and the Artist Placement Group (APG); shared vocabularies and the role of language in cross-disciplinary collaboration; and the impact of interdisciplinary work on the identity of the hybrid practitioner. Keynote presenters include Anne Collins Goodyear (director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art), artist Mark Dion, Craig Richardson (professor of fine art at Northumbria University, UK), and D. Graham Burnett (editor of Cabinet magazine). Together with papers, roundtables, and keynote presentations, the conference incorporates performative and event-based creative projects grounded in hybrid art-science-technology research.

LINK TO LIVESTREAM

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Heather Harpham, Theater in Motion

March 23-27
Sponsored by The Commons and the Department of Theatre

Heather Harpham is a writer, performer and teacher of physical theater/improvisation. She is a Senior Teacher of Action Theater, a physical improvisation form, which synthesizes her early training in both theater and writing. Physical improvisation continues to be a generative source for her solo performances and collaborations. Together with Cassie & Danny Tunick, Harpham performs as part of the improvisational dance/theater company Second Nature. She is also a core member of the critically acclaimed physical theater group, Company SoGoNo.

Artist Talk

5:30pm Monday, March 23 | The Commons

Coffee @ The Commons

10:00am Tuesday, March 24 | The Commons

Workshop Demonstration

5:30pm Wednesday, March 25 | The Commons
with THR 302 Undergraduate Seminar

Performance

7:30pm Thursday, March 26 | Baustian Theatre - Murphy Hall
Burning is a highly kinetic, semi-comic romp through the landscapes of climage change where comedy, tragedy, activism, and cautious optimism collide. Using movement, song, monologue, and other imagery, it invokes Hurricane Sandy, our obsession with apocalyptic film, and countless other things that preoccupy us while Rome burns.

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Heap of Birds Hosting Beyond the Chief: Notes from a (Failed) Curator

Robert Warrior, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana
3:30pm Wednesday, April 1 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Robert Warrior is Director of American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is Professor of American Indian Studies, English, and History. An enrolled member of the Osage Nation, he is the author of The People and the Word: Reading Native Nonfiction, American Indian Literary Nationalism (with Craig Womack and Jace Weaver), Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee (with Paul Chaat Smith) and Tribal Secrets: Recovering American Indian Intellectual Traditions. He is also a member of the Native Critics Collective, which published Reasoning Together, a collection of essays focused on Native literary criticism.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Mennonites on the Move; Understanding Anabaptist migration patterns through the application of univariate genetic markers

Phillip Melton, Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease/Statistical Genetics, University of Western Australia
12:00pm Friday, April 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

STUDENT EVENT

Coffee Chat

with James Woelfel, Professor of Philosophy and Humanities & Western Civilization
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, April 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Hosted by the students of the University Honors Program, Coffee Chats provide a venue for informal conversations between students and KU faculty. The organizing students have selected a theme each month to discuss with the faculty member. April's discussion topic is: the History of the Liberal Arts at KU.

FACULTY EVENT

The Big Share

12:00-1:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

The Big Share brings together faculty from multiple disciplines to discuss their successes and questions about the use of service learning pedagogy tocreate university-community partnerships. Faculty will be encouraged to support one another's efforts, work together, and share their experiences for the benefit of others. The event will create an opportunity to find potential collaborators.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Movement in Print: Bolivian Migrant Communities and Grassroots Publishing Networks

Magalí Rabasa, Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas
12:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Kij Johnson, English
Daniel Tapia Takaki, Physics & Astronomy
Dawn Fallik, Journalism
John Symons, Philosophy
Stacey Swearingen White, Urban Planning

Event Leader:
Mike Vitevitch, Psychology

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Human migrations in the Aleutians

Dixie West, Anthropology, Kansas State University
12:00pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

POSTER SESSION

C21 Consortium

3:30-5:30pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

PROGRAM

CLAS Mini College

June 1-4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Mini College is a week-long program developed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It has been providing lifelong learners the opportunity to rediscover the student experience since summer 2009. As the largest academic unit at the University of Kansas, the College is uniquely positioned to offer a broad program that satisfies a wide variety of interests. Courses span the humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, social and behavioral sciences, international and interdisciplinary studies, and the arts. Mini College is open to all adults, not just KU alumni. More information can be found on the Mini-College website: minicollege.ku.edu.