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Programs and Events

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Who Serves?: Citizenship, the Market, and the All-Volunteer Army

Beth Bailey, Professor, American History, Temple University
3:30pm Wednesday, October 1 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Beth Bailey is a historian of the recent United States. She specializes in the history of gender and sexuality and in the history of war and society / U.S. military and society; her most recent book is America’s Army: Making the All-Volunteer Force. Prof. Bailey’s recent research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; in 2014-15 she is the Oscar Handlin ACLS Fellow and will be on leave from Temple. Her current research project is on the U.S. Army and the Problem of Race, 1965–1985. She has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies, History Honors director, and interim chair for the Temple History Department, and works with graduate students in both the history of gender and sexuality and military history.

CONFERENCE

20th Annual Meeting of the Mid-America Alliance for African Studies
African Studies: Concepts and Practices for Decolonzing Knowledge

October 3-4 | The Commons

Although standard forms of disciplinary knowledge often pose as positionless reflections on objective reality, an enduring contribution of work in African Studies has been to decolonize disciplinary knowledge: not only to illuminate how standard forms of knowledge bear the imprint of colonial power, but also to develop concepts and scholarly practices, rooted in everyday experience of life in African settings, that provide the foundations for broader human liberation. Presentations include a keynote address by Garth A. Myers, Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of Urban International Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, CT, who will speak on Building from the South: Comparative Urbanism from African Knowledge Bases. To register or for more information visit http://associations.missouristate.edu/maaas or contact Glenn Adams at adamsg@ku.edu. For abstracts of conference presentations, see http://issuu.com/kansasafricanstudiescenter/docs/maaasabstracts.

PERFORMANCE

Space Time: An Adventure in Melody and Rhythm

A performance of Indian classical music by Purnaprajna Bangere & Supreet Deshpande
7:00pm Monday, October 6 | The Commons
Sponsored by The Commons and the Hall Center for the Humanities

In this performance of Indian classical music, the audience will experience space in the form of musical space--its melody and harmony. Time is represented by the beat and varying rhythms.

Purnaprajna Bangere studied at an important school of violin players in India, where he trained under the well known south Indian violinist and a teacher HKN Murthy. HKN Murthy is the student of the legendary Indian musician M. S. Gopalakrishnan. Purnaprajna is a representative of his school, and plays the style of music known as the Parur style, characterized by high technical virtuosity and musicianship.

Supreet Deshpande is one of the leading Tabla virtuousos of Indian classical music. A child prodigy, he was trained by his illustrious father Tabla virtuoso Pt. Kiran Deshpande. He has also learned the intricacies of the "Taal" (beats) from the great tabla maestro Pt. Suresh Talwalkar. His style is rooted in clarity of ‘Bols’ (syllables), a soothing balance of sound (naad), technique, and crisp rendering of complex rhythms.

A light reception will follow the performance.

PRESENTATION: RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY

Research Opportunities at the Department of Defense

1:00-2:30pm Tuesday, October 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by KU Center for Research

This discussion will offer insight into the wide variety of research opportunities available through the US Department of Defense. During the session, presenters will highlight the funding goals of the Department of Defense as well as discuss broaders areas of interest for the Department of Defense, which include health, social sciences, engineering, computer science, and more.

LECTURE

What Can We Teach Our Posthuman Descendants?

John Symons, Chair & Professor of Philosophy, University of Kansas
7:30 pm Tuesday, October 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

John Symons is Chair and Professor of the Philosophy Department at the University of Kansas. Symons received his PhD from Boston University. He most recently served as an associate professor and chair of the philosophy department at the University of Texas, El Paso. His research interests include metaphysics and epistemology of science (how scientists know what they know), the philosophy of psychology, and the logic behind knowledge and belief. Philosopher Nick Bostrom recently described a "posthuman" as an individual who has gone beyond "the maximum attainable capacities by any current human being without recourse to new technological means." In his lecture, Symons will discuss the posthuman, including what the term might mean and how we can talk to and think about our posthuman descendants.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Central American Kids and Manufactured Crises in Southern Texas: 1989 & 2014

Peter Haney, Assistant Director, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, University of Kansas
12:00-1:00pm Friday, October 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series is a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, October 10 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors.

Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

WORKSHOP

KU Hunger Summit

Tanya Fields, Food Justice Activist
9:00am-12:00pm Friday, October 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Sustainability

This action-oriented summit of faculty, staff, students, and community members will aim to identify opportunities for the University of Kansas to address hunger and its underlying causes through education, research and service.

Featuring a keynote presentation from food justice activist Tanya Fields, the event will focus on the KU's role in addressing strategies related to hunger and poverty in the Douglas County Community Health Plan. Through facilitated discussions, participants will begin developing a road map for engaging the KU community in helping achieve the goals of this community plan.

RED HOT RESEARCH

Theme: Sustainability

4:00pm Friday, October 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by The Commons and the Center for Sustainability

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Belinda Sturm, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Deb Adams, Social Welfare
Bradley Lane, Public Affairs & Administration
Jane Zhao, Business
Paul Stock, Sociology

LECTURE

The Open Access Revolution: Expected and Unexpected Changes to the Research Landscape

Kelvin K. Droegemeier, University of Oklahoma
10:00am-11:30am Monday, October 20 | The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Libraries and the Office of the Provost

This presentation briefly examines both the challenges and opportunities – practical and philosophical – associated with the open sharing of research data. Fundamental issues include but are not limited to the definition of data, determination of what should be shared, assurance of proper use, the relevance of reproducibility, assignment of credit, and cost as well as ownership of the cost. Views will be offered regarding the potential for open access to fundamentally transform the scholarship enterprise in ways both good and bad.

Kelvin K. Droegemeier earned a B.S. with Special Distinction in Meteorology in 1980 from the University of Oklahoma, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric science in 1982 and 1985, respectively, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He joined the University of Oklahoma in September, 1985 and in 1989 co-founded the NSF Science and Technology Center (STC) for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) and served as its director for over a decade. In 2003, he co-founded the NSF Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) and served for several years as its deputy director.

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

The Reconfiguration of Immigrant Latino Families in Light of the Contemporary Immigration Regime

Cecilia Menjívar, Professor, School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University
3:30pm Tuesday, October 21 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Cecilia Menjivar is the Cowden Distinguished Professor in the T. Denny School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. Her research specializations include: Family Dynamics and Race; Ethnicity; and Migration. Menjivar focuses on the effects of macrostructural processes on individuals' lives and actions. Specifically, she examines the social worlds of individuals who live in hostile and violent environments. In her research such adverse contexts result from different forms of exclusion-legal, social, economic-as well as from institutional, symbolic, and political forms of violence.

Menjivar's research interests can be summarized in two areas. The first focuses on U.S.-bound migration. She has been studying the effects of legal, social and economic exclusion on different spheres of social life among immigrants, such as social networks, family, gender relations, religious participation, and transnational ties, focusing primarily on Central American immigrants in the United States. The other area of research interest lies in Latin America, with special attention to Central America, where Menjivar is interested in the effects of structural adjustments on daily life, as seen through the lens of gender.

COFFEE @ THE COMMONS

Lori Nix, Photographer

10:30am Friday, October 24 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hallmark Corporate Foundation, the KU Department of Design, and The Commons

As a photographer, Lori Nix constructs her subject matter. She builds scenes and photographs them, using no digital manipulation. Thus, building materials, lighting, issues of scale and space are significant concerns when she is making new work. Her series of photographs include Accidentally Kansas, Some Other Place, Lost, Unnatural History, and The City. Nix works in Brooklyn, but she is originally from Norton, Kansas. The collection of the Spencer Museum of Art holds a number of her photographs.

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Louise Shelley, University Professor, School of Public Policy, George Mason University
3:30pm Tuesday, October 28 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Louise Shelley is a University Professor in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, where she is the founding director of the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC). She is a leading expert on the relationship among terrorism, organized crime and corruption as well as human trafficking, transnational crime and terrorism with a particular focus on the former Soviet Union. She also specializes in illicit financial flows and money laundering.

Her most recent book: Dirty Entanglements: Corruption, Crime and Terrorismwas published by Cambridge University Press in July 2014. She is the author of Human Trafficking: A Global Perspective (Cambridge 2010), Policing Soviet Society (Routledge, 1996), Lawyers in Soviet Worklife and Crime and Modernization, as well as numerous articles and book chapters on all aspects of transnational crime and corruption. She is also an editor (with Sally Stoecker) of Human Traffic and Transnational Crime: Eurasian and American Perspectives.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Pre-Hispanic Migrations in Central America: What We Think We Know & What We Wish We Knew

John Hoopes, Professor of Anthropology, University of Kansas
12:00-1:00pm Friday, October 31 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series is a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, October 31 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors.

Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

LECTURE

Byron T. Shutz Award Lecture

Jide Wintoki, KU School of Business
3:30pm Thursday, November 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Jide Wintoki is the 28th recipient of the Byron T. Shutz Excellence in Teaching Award. Nominees for this annual award are selected from student surveys. Professor Wintoki will give a lecture, which will be followed by a reception in his honor.

LECTURE

Emily Graslie: Chief Curiosity Correspondent, Field Museum
7:00pm Thursday, November 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, the Natural History Museum, the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and the Office of First Year Experience

Emily Graslie is celebrated for her popular YouTube show “The Brain Scoop,” which explores behind-the-scenes of the natural history museum. Her reports from the field range from romantic ants to skinning a wolf to odd museum jobs. Graslie majored in studio art at the University of Montana where she discovered her passion for zoological museums during a visit to the University’s museum to practice her sketching.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Border Apocalypse: The Literary Fantasies of Our Doom Around a Border Line

Rafael Acosta, Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas
12:00-1:00pm Friday, November 14 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series is a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, November 14 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors.

Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, November 14 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Byron Caminero-Santangelo, English/Environmental Studes
Mariana Candido, History
Uma Outka, Law
Cathy Preston, Film & Media Studies
Pam Fine, Journalism

PRESENTATION

Maximilian Schich, Associate Professor for Art and Technology, University of Texas - Dallas
5:30pm Monday, November 17 | The Commons

An Art Historian by training, Maximilian Schich brings together hermeneutics, information visualization, computer science, and physics to understand and better explain art, history, and culture. Through his research, he explores the nature and emergence of complexity in the arts and humanities using an approach that combines quantitative analysis and visualization with hermeneutic interpretation, which sets the base for collaborations that aim to model and simulate previously hidden phenomena.
Through his teaching, Schich seeks to explore and nurture Multidisciplinary Approaches in Arts and Technology as well as various aspects of Cultural Science, a collaborative process that embraces humanistic inquiry, physics, computer science, and information design in a single coherent workflow.

RESEARCH SHARING

The Big Share

12:00pm Thursday, November 20 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Civic & Social Responsibility

The Big Share brings together faculty from multiple disciplines to discuss their successes and questions about the use of service learning pedagogy tocreate university-community partnerships. Faculty will be encouraged to support one another's efforts, work together, and share their experiences for the benefit of others. The event will create an opportunity to find potential collaborators.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, December 5 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors.

Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, December 5 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Alex Diener, Geography
Alfred Ho, Public Affairs & Administration
Lumen Mulligan, Law
Steven Duval, Spencer Museum of Art
Rich Glor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology/Biodiversity Institute