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Programs and Events

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Heather Harpham, Theater in Motion

March 23-27
Sponsored by The Commons and the Department of Theatre

Heather Harpham is a writer, performer and teacher of physical theater/improvisation. She is a Senior Teacher of Action Theater, a physical improvisation form, which synthesizes her early training in both theater and writing. Physical improvisation continues to be a generative source for her solo performances and collaborations. Together with Cassie & Danny Tunick, Harpham performs as part of the improvisational dance/theater company Second Nature. She is also a core member of the critically acclaimed physical theater group, Company SoGoNo.

Artist Talk

5:30pm Monday, March 23 | The Commons

Coffee @ The Commons

10:00am Tuesday, March 24 | The Commons

Workshop Demonstration

5:30pm Wednesday, March 25 | The Commons
with THR 302 Undergraduate Seminar

Performance

7:30pm Thursday, March 26 | Baustian Theatre - Murphy Hall
Burning is a highly kinetic, semi-comic romp through the landscapes of climage change where comedy, tragedy, activism, and cautious optimism collide. Using movement, song, monologue, and other imagery, it invokes Hurricane Sandy, our obsession with apocalyptic film, and countless other things that preoccupy us while Rome burns.

FILM SCREENING

Bridegroom

Shane Bitney Crone
7:00pm Monday, March 30 | The Commons
Sponsored by Student Union Activities
Bridegroom is a documentary directed by Linda Bloodworth-Thomason that tells the emotional journey of Shane and Tom, two young men in a loving and committed relationship — a relationship that was cut tragically short by a misstep off the side of a roof. The story of what happened after this accidental death– of how people without the legal protections of marriage can find themselves completely shut out and ostracized– is poignant, enraging and opens a window onto the issue of marriage equality like no speech or lecture ever will.

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Heap of Birds Hosting Beyond the Chief: Notes from a (Failed) Curator

Robert Warrior, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana
3:30pm Wednesday, April 1 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Robert Warrior is Director of American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is Professor of American Indian Studies, English, and History. An enrolled member of the Osage Nation, he is the author of The People and the Word: Reading Native Nonfiction, American Indian Literary Nationalism (with Craig Womack and Jace Weaver), Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee (with Paul Chaat Smith) and Tribal Secrets: Recovering American Indian Intellectual Traditions. He is also a member of the Native Critics Collective, which published Reasoning Together, a collection of essays focused on Native literary criticism.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Mennonites on the Move; Understanding Anabaptist migration patterns through the application of univariate genetic markers

Phillip Melton, Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease/Statistical Genetics, University of Western Australia
12:00pm Friday, April 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, April 6 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group began after meeting at Red Hot Research in 2011. They have been exploring the computational tools used by James Sterbenz to study the network formed by the national electrical grid to determine whether these tools could be used in other areas and focus on problems in different domains that have a common underlying cause. Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

STUDENT EVENT

Faculty Coffee Chat: 50 Years of Liberal Arts & Sciences at KU

With Professor James Woelfel, Philosophy and Humanities & Western Civilization
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, April 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Professor Woelfel will discuss "The Idea of A Liberal Education: Continuity and Change," which is a chapter in the forthcoming book "The University of Kansas, 1965-2015." Woelfel defines "liberal education" as "an education that requires of students a wide exposure to human knowledge and culture, typically through 'general education' courses in the liberal arts and sciences." He will discuss the history of general education at KU from 1965 to the present, exploring how KU's curriculum has changed in response to national movements in higher education as well as changes within American society as a whole. A project of the University Honors Program's Co-curricular Student Advisory Board, Faculty Coffee Chats are designed to give students an opportunity to learn from KU's leading faculty in a small, informal setting. This event is open to all members of the KU and Lawrence community. Coffee and snacks will be served.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

LECTURE

Closing the Gap: Salary Negotiation Skills for Women

Facilitated by Keri Westland, State Street Global Human Resources
5:30-7:00pm Wednesday, April 15 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Career Center

Join the University Career Center, The Emily Taylor Center for Gender Equity, and HerCampus to learn about salary equity issues and develop salary negotiation skills.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Movement in Print: Bolivian Migrant Communities and Grassroots Publishing Networks

Magalí Rabasa, Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas
12:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Kij Johnson, English
Daniel Tapia Takaki, Physics & Astronomy
Dawn Fallik, Journalism
John Symons, Philosophy
Stacey Swearingen White, Urban Planning

Event Leader:
Mike Vitevitch, Psychology

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, April 20 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group began after meeting at Red Hot Research in 2011. They have been exploring the computational tools used by James Sterbenz to study the network formed by the national electrical grid to determine whether these tools could be used in other areas and focus on problems in different domains that have a common underlying cause. Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, May 4 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group began after meeting at Red Hot Research in 2011. They have been exploring the computational tools used by James Sterbenz to study the network formed by the national electrical grid to determine whether these tools could be used in other areas and focus on problems in different domains that have a common underlying cause. Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Human migrations in the Aleutians

Dixie West, Anthropology, Kansas State University
12:00pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

POSTER SESSION

C21 Consortium

3:30-5:30pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

PROGRAM

CLAS Mini College

June 1-4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Mini College is a week-long program developed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It has been providing lifelong learners the opportunity to rediscover the student experience since summer 2009. As the largest academic unit at the University of Kansas, the College is uniquely positioned to offer a broad program that satisfies a wide variety of interests. Courses span the humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, social and behavioral sciences, international and interdisciplinary studies, and the arts. Mini College is open to all adults, not just KU alumni. More information can be found on the Mini-College website: minicollege.ku.edu.