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Programs & Events Programs and Events

PANEL

Jayhawks Breaking Barriers: A Resiliency Panel Discussion

6:00-8:00pm Monday, March 27 | The Commons
Hosted by Jayhawks Breaking Barriers

Jayhawks Breaking Barriers (http://jbb.ku.edu/) will host a discussion on strategies to recognize personal and professional strengths and build resiliency. The event will identify ways to leverage individual skills as strengths to impress potential employers and to overcome failure constructively.

With a focus on leadership skills, this two-part workshop will consist of two parts.

Part 1 (6:00–7:15 pm). Interact with a panel of academic and business professionals: Learn about their careers, how they overcame failure or rejection, and how they have recognized and leveraged their strengths to accomplish their goals. This open discussion will offer ways to think about how to achieve success.

Part 2 (7:20–8:00 pm). Work in small groups to think about ways to frame a skillset and how to further recognize strengths. Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of their résumé/CV to help break-down and list skills. This activity, aims to help participants identify soft skills as well as technical skills, which can both be used as strengths in a cover letter and during interviews.

Participants are welcome to join the full workshop or join either Part 1 or Part 2 of the workshop. Refreshments will be offered at the start of Part 1. Please RSVP here to attend this free event. We hope to see you there!​

STUDENT EVENT

Empowerment Yoga

9:30am-10:45am Tuesday, March 28 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center

Empowerment Yoga is a gender-inclusive yoga class designed to create empowerment opportunities for students, particularly those at increased risk for victimization of sexual violence, but open to all students wishing to increase their sense of bodily autonomy and power.

LECTURE

Serving Social Justice and Pedagogical Innovation Through Open Educational Practices

Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
10:00am-11:30am Thursday, March 30 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright, KU Libraries

Higher education promises to be a vehicle for economic and social mobility; however, this promise increasingly goes begging as our institutions are often structured to reinforce existing social inequalities. Open Educational Practices (OEP) encompass both the creation, adaptation, and adoption of open educational resources (OER) as well as the design of renewable assignments where students are empowered as co-creators of knowledge. More broadly, OEP embrace a collaborative, transparent, flexible, and learner-centered approach to education. This presentation will make a case for why the shift away from traditional (closed) practices is not only desirable but inevitable, and how OEP support the modern university’s mission by serving both social justice and pedagogical innovation.

Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani is the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Instructor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, Canada. Dr. Jhangiani serves as the Senior Open Education Advocacy and Research Fellow with BCcampus, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. You can find him online at @thatpsychprof or thatpsychprof.com.

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Rock Chalk Talks

4:30pm Thursday, March 30 | The Commons
Presented by the Center for Undergraduate Research

Rock Chalk Talks is a monthly event for undergraduate students that will put a handful of undergraduate researchers in the spotlight for approximately 6 minutes while they each present their research and talk about certain topics of the month. Included in each event:

• Undergraduate researchers will present their work while focusing on a theme
• A competitive trivia game after each presentation on the research that was just shared
• Prizes for the winners of the trivia game
• A social hour with snacks and friends

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 39: Environment & Future

4:00pm Friday, March 31 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Michael Krueger, Visual Art
Bradley Lane, Public Affairs & Administration
Mike Sinclair, Design
James Blakemore, Chemistry
Ali Brox, Environmental Studies Program
Emcee:
Kate Meyer, Spencer Museum of Art

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

3:00-6:00pm Monday, April 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

CLACS Graduate Research Symposium provides an opportunity for graduate students in Latin American Studies to share their research with fellow students and faculty. It provides valuable feedback for the presenters and creates an opportunity for exchange among researchers at KU.

STUDENT EVENT

Empowerment Yoga

9:30am-10:45am April 4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center

Empowerment Yoga is a gender-inclusive yoga class designed to create empowerment opportunities for students, particularly those at increased risk for victimization of sexual violence, but open to all students wishing to increase their sense of bodily autonomy and power.

PUBLIC EVENT

Closing the Gap: Salary Negotiation for Women

5:00pm Tuesday, April 4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Career Service Alliance and the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity

Closing the Gap: Salary Negotiation Skills for Women will be held on Equal Pay Day to address salary disparity. Join the KU Career Services Alliance and The Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity for a panel event followed by application and networking to learn about salary equity issues and develop salary negotiation skills.

FILM PREMIERE & PANEL

PBS: The Minority Experience During World War I

7:00pm Wednesday, April 5 | The Commons
Supported by the Center for Global & International Studies

This event will feature a sneak-peek of the PBS documentary focusing on race and ethnicity during WWI. This short film is compiled with clips from PBS’s The Great War, a 6-hour series that will be aired on April 10-12. The 40-minute film documents the experience of minorities—particularly African-American soldiers and Native-American code talkers—whose participation in the war to "make the world safe for democracy” has been largely forgotten. The film will be followed by an interdisciplinary panel discussion.

COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP

Talking Back: Digital Identity & Community

Facilitated by: An Sasala (Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies / Film & Media Studies) and Stefanie Torres (English - Nonfiction Creative Writing)
2:00pm Friday, April 7 | The Commons
Supported by The Commons in conjunction with programming for The Future University

Talking Back is led by graduate students as an extension of The Future University programming at The Commons. It explores graduate students’ role in the evolution of the university. In three sessions, graduate students, faculty, and staff are invited to reimagine the structure of The Future University. Co-create the content with us as we consider:
-What pedagogical values and learning styles inform the future university classroom?
-How does technology in digital and physical spaces interact with teaching?
-Is there an intersection of free speech and political neutrality in a learning environment?

OUTING

THE NEW EMERGENCY: Ecosphere Studies and the Future University

11:00am Thursday, April 13 | Outside, in front of The Commons
Led by: Chris Brown (KU Geography & Atmospheric Sciences/Environmental Studies Program), Matt Burke (KU Visual Art), John Head (KU Law/Environmental Studies Program), Aubrey Streit Krug (English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln), and Bill Vitek (Philosophy, Clarkson University)
Supported by the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Sustainability, and The Commons

Join Ecosphere advocates on an outdoor observation excursion to the historic Gorrill Farmstead just west of Lawrence. This land is jointly stewarded by the Malone Family Land Preservation Foundation and the Land Institute.

The ecological crisis of today is often attributed to problems in human understanding-- problems that education could solve. But what if education itself is the problem? If a curriculum teaches lessons in control, extraction, exploitation, and human superiority, then a future university might critique and move beyond this model.

Registration required. Email thecommons@ku.edu. Space is limited.
Presented in conjunction with a day of activities that illustrate and explain the Ecophere Studies Model for a Future University. Events may be attended as a set or individually.

OBSERVATION & DISCOVERY

THE NEW EMERGENCY: Ecosphere Studies and the Future University

2:00pm Thursday, April 13 | Spencer Museum of Art
Led by: Kate Meyer (KU Spencer Museum of Art), Chris Brown (KU Geography & Atmospheric Sciences/ Environmental Studies Program), and Matt Burke (KU Visual Art).
Supported by the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Sustainability, and The Commons

This opportunity illustrates the Ecosphere Studies model through conscious observation. Participants will practice active looking at the Spencer Museum of Art or in Marvin Grove.

The ecological crisis of today is often attributed to problems in human understanding-- problems that education could solve. But what if education itself is the problem? If a curriculum teaches lessons in control, extraction, exploitation, and human superiority, then a future university might critique and move beyond this model.

Registration required. Email thecommons@ku.edu. Space is limited.
Presented in conjunction with a day of activities that illustrate and explain the Ecophere Studies Model for a Future University. Events may be attended as a set or individually.

REFLECTION & SYNTHESIS

THE NEW EMERGENCY: Ecosphere Studies and the Future University

2:00pm Thursday, April 13 | Spencer Museum of Art
Speakers include: Chris Brown (KU Geography & Atmospheric Sciences/Environmental Studies Program), Matt Burke (KU Visual Art), John Head (KU Law/Environmental Studies Program), Aubrey Streit Krug (English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln), Bill Vitek (Philosophy, Clarkson University), and Wes Jackson (The Land Institute)
Supported by the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Sustainability, and The Commons

Participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the Ecosphere Studies model in a discussion setting.

The ecological crisis of today is often attributed to problems in human understanding-- problems that education could solve. But what if education itself is the problem? If a curriculum teaches lessons in control, extraction, exploitation, and human superiority, then a future university might critique and move beyond this model.

Presented in conjunction with a day of activities that illustrate and explain the Ecophere Studies Model for a Future University. Events may be attended as a set or individually.

PERFORMANCE

African Language Festival

5:00-7:00pm Thursday, April 20 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Department of African and African-American Studies

The Kansas African Studies Center and the Department of African and African-American Studies present the 2nd Annual African Language Festival. The festival highlights the work of KU students studying African languages, through poetry, music, skits, and other formats. This event is intended to be a fun language-learning celebration.

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 40: The Future University

4:00pm Friday, April 21 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

PUBLIC EVENT

Understanding Free Speech on a University Campus
A Panel Discussion and Dialogue with Audience
Stefan M. Bradley - Associate Professor of History St. Louis University
Connie Burk - Executive Director, the NW Network
Susan Kruth - Senior Program Officer, Legal and Public Advocacy, FIRE
Frank LoMonte - Executive Director, Student Press Law Center
Moderator, Jeff Chasen - Associate Vice Provost, Integrity & Compliance, KU

7:00pm Tuesday, April 25 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor, the Office of the Provost, the Department of African and African-American Studies, the Department of American Studies, and The Commons

The First Amendment guarantees a right to free speech, but how does that apply at a university? How does the First Amendment affect a university’s ability to promote the discussion and debate of ideas? How does the concept of free speech intersect with free thinking? Does the First Amendment apply differently to students, staff, and faculty? To what extent does the First Amendment protect the dissemination of research? What opportunities and risks are there for activism and advocacy among students, staff, and faculty? What can we learn from the history of activism on a college campus? How do these questions affect the future of universities?

Join us for a discussion of these questions and more, with a panel of scholars on campus activism, constitutional law, and the intersections between them.

Stefan M. Bradley is fascinated with the efforts and abilities of black college students to change not only their scholastic environments but also the communities that surrounded their institutions of higher learning. Through protests and demands, students have been able to influence college curricula as well as the policies of their schools. His book, Harlem vs. Columbia University: Black Student Power in the Late 1960s follows the black students who risked their educations and lives during the famous controversy at Columbia University between 1968-1969. Currently, he is working on Blackened Ivy: Civil Rights, Black Power, and Ivy League Universities in the Postwar Era for New York University Press. His work on student/youth activism has been discussed in the Harvard Law Review, History News Network, NPR, C-Span2 BookTV, MSNBC, BBC, and BET.Research.

Connie Burk directs the NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse (The NW Network). Under her leadership, the Network established the National LGBT Training & Technical Assistance Initiative and the National Q&A Institute. Connie also spearheaded two national campaigns to publicize the Network, one of which was featured in Times Square. A nominator says of Burk’s work, “One of the most important ways Connie has influenced the antiviolence movement is by bringing violence prevention and a positive vision for change to the forefront of the work.”

Susan Kruth earned her B.A. from New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study in 2007, with a concentration in music and film. After a handful of short film and documentary gigs, Susan was inspired to go to law school in order to study the ways that the Constitution protects filmmakers. While attending the University of Virginia School of Law, she served as musical director of the law school’s a cappella group, the A Cappellate Opinions, and performed in UVA Law’s spring musical comedy program, the Libel Show. Susan earned her J.D. in 2011 and is now a member of the Virginia State Bar. She got her start working to protect free speech through a fellowship with the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression in Charlottesville, Virginia. She has also completed civil rights internships with the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union LGBT & AIDS Project.

Frank LoMonte returns to KU having spoken on the Free Speech in Social Media panel at The Commons in 2014. He became the executive director of the Student Press Law Center in 2008 after practicing law with Atlanta-based Sutherland LLP and clerking for federal judges on the Northern District of Georgia and the Eleventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. Before law school, LoMonte was an award-winning investigative journalist and political columnist for daily newspapers in Florida and Georgia. LoMonte graduated magna cum laude from the University of Georgia School of Law, where he was a senior editor of the Georgia Law Review. His articles about the First Amendment and media-law topics have been widely published in Education Week, The Chronicle of Higher Education, the American University Law Review, the University of North Carolina First Amendment Law Review, and in many other outlets.

Jeff Chasen is the Director of Integrity & Compliance at KU, providing independent oversight and coordination of institutional compliance. He earned a BA in 1984 and JD in 1987 from George Washington University. He is a member of the National Association of College and University Attorneys, the Public Risk Management Association and the Association of Governmental Risk Pools.

INTERACTIVE PANEL & DISCUSSION

Talking Back: Political Spaces & Free Speech

Facilitated by: Ramón Alvarado (Philosophy), Abigail Barefoot (Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies), and Alex Cloyd (American Studies / Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)
3:30pm Wednesday, April 26 | The Commons
Supported by The Commons in conjunction with programming for The Future University

Talking Back is led by graduate students as an extension of The Future University programming at The Commons. It explores graduate students’ role in the evolution of the university. In three sessions, graduate students, faculty, and staff are invited to reimagine the structure of The Future University. Co-create the content with us as we consider:
-What pedagogical values and learning styles inform the future university classroom?
-How does technology in digital and physical spaces interact with teaching?
-Is there an intersection of free speech and political neutrality in a learning environment?

RESEARCH SHOWCASE

C21 Consortium

3:30-5:30pm Friday, May 5 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 41

4:00pm Friday, September 8 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 42

4:00pm Friday, September 29 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 43: The Future University

4:00pm Friday, October 27 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 44

4:00pm Friday, December 1 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.