Event Archive

Framing the Dialogue, Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, October 22, 2021 The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, to reveal overlaps and connections across areas of interesting and methodological approaches. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features researchers, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, the University will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration. 

COVID Modifications:
In an effort to be responsive to changing health/safety protocol, Red Hot Research will be held in the main space of The Commons, with limited seating. Refreshments will be provided after the presentations in the Weaver Courtyard, outside.

Presenters:

Briana McGeough (she/her/hers), Social Welfare, Addiction, mutual help groups, SMART Recovery, 12-Step
Giselle Anatol (she/her/hers), English, LGBTQ children's literature, young adult (YA), African diaspora, Hurricane Child
Amanda Mollet (she/her/hers), Educational Leadership & Policy Studies
Charlene Muehlenhard (she/her/hers), Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies / Psychology, Sexual Orientation Labels, Masculinity, Sexual Coercion
   Johanna Ramirez (she/her/hers)
   Eddie Wright (he/him/his)
   Nicolette Zangari (she/her/hers)

 

Presented in conjunction with the "51 Years OUT!" Celebration of Gay Liberation History at KU and in Lawrence.

 

Activity
Knowing Where you Are: Land as Teacher
12:00-1:00pm Thursday, October 21, 2021 Robinson Park, In zhúje Waxóbe
Presented by the KU First Nations Student Association and The Commons

Dr. Jay T. Johnson, Professor, Geography & Atmospheric Science
Katrina McClure, Muscogee | PhD Candidate, Geography & Atmospheric Science
Josh Meisel, Lakota | PhD Candidate, Geography & Atmospheric Science

“The land is the real teacher. All we need as students is mindfulness. Paying attention is a form of reciprocity with the living world, receiving the gifts with open eyes and open heart.”  
Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

What is your relationship to place?
How do you find deeper connection to where you are?

Learn about the Haskell Environmental Research Studies (HERS) program and the importance of place-based curriculum to Native students in environmental science. This summer, HERS students engaged In zhúje Waxóbe in its curriculum.

Participants may share their own practices for connecting to place with the orientation of land as teacher. We hope to build community and skills for noticing connection to place in more and meaningful ways.

Capacity for this event is limited. Please register by emailing thecommons@ku.edu.

Lecture, Lecture and Book Signing
2:00-3:00pm Thursday, October 21, 2021 The Commons

Join Dr. Katie Batza, Associate Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, for this presentation, which will incorporate information from her recently-published book, Before AIDS: Gay Health Politics in the 1970s. The presentation will cover critical themes and issues that arose in the 1970s and played an important role in advocating for LGBTQ+ rights over the last 50 years. Outdoor reception to follow

Doors will open at 12:30pm for this event. If you prefer to watch a livestream of this event via Zoom, please register here: Zoom Registration Link.

Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities. This event is hosted as part of the 51 Years OUT! event, which celebrates the history of QT activism on KU's campus and can only occur through a series of collaborations and co-sponsorships including: The Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity; Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Department; The Hall Center for the Humanities; Watkins History Museum; The Commons; Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; KU Alumni Association; KU Libraries; Lawrence Public Library; The Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging; The Office of Multicultural Affairs; Office of the Vice Provost for Student Affairs; KU Law OUTLaws and Allies in partnership with Douglas County Legal Aid Society; and KU Student Senate.

Book Talk, Care & Well-being, Humans in a More Than Human World, Public Event
5:30-7:00pm Wednesday, October 6, 2021 The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Department of English, The Commons, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Project on the History of Black Writing, and the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities

Michael Kleber-Diggs is the author of Worldly Things, for which he won the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. His poems offer guidance on ways forward—toward radical kindness and a socially responsible poetics. “Let’s create folklore side-by-side,” he urges, asking us to aspire to a form of nurturing defined by tenderness, to a kind of community devoted to mutual prosperity. “All of us want,” after all, “our share of light, and just enough rainfall.”

Kleber-Diggs was born and raised in Kansas and now lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. His work has appeared in Lit Hub, the Rumpus, Rain Taxi, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Water~Stone Review, Midway Review, North  Dakota Quarterly and a few anthologies. Michael teaches poetry and creative non-fiction through the Minnesota Prison Writers Workshop.

Book sales will be provided on-site by KU Bookstore.

Care & Well-being, Coffee @ The Commons, Discussion, Humans in a More Than Human World, Student Event
3:00-4:00pm Wednesday, October 6, 2021 The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Department of English, The Commons, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Project on the History of Black Writing, and the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities

Michael Kleber-Diggs is the author of Worldly Things, for which he won the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. His poems offer guidance on ways forward—toward radical
kindness and a socially responsible poetics. “Let’s create folklore side-by-side,” he urges, asking us to aspire to a form of nurturing defined by tenderness, to a kind of
community devoted to mutual prosperity. “All of us want,” after all, “our share of light, and just enough rainfall.”

Join Michael Kleber-Diggs for Coffee @ The Commons prior to the reading. Coffee @ The Commons is a series that offers space for more informal dialogues with visiting scholars.

Panel, Public Event, The Future University, Undergraduate Student Event
12:00-1:00pm CT Wednesday, October 6, 2021 Online
Presented by The Commons, the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity, the Center for Service Learning, the KU Civic Engagement Ambassadors, and the School of Social Welfare

This series features experts on different aspects of US democracy and centers opportunities for civic engagement. Programs in this series feature experts from across campus, as well as specialists beyond the University. In Part VIII: Changes to Election Participation in Kansas, presenters will speak on topics that bear relevance to faculty, staff, and students at KU.

 

 

Panelists:

Steve Allton (he/him), Office of the General Counsel, KU
Patrick Miller (he/him), Political Science, KU
Birdie Alt (she/her), KU Student Senate
Peyton Browning (she/her), Prairie Roots

  • What does House Bill 2183 say?
  • How will it change voting in Kansas?
  • Where does litigation about the bill stand now?
  • How does it apply to campus organizations?
  • How does this bill compare to new legislation in other states?

 

Link to Zoom Registration.

 

Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, October 1, 2021 The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, to reveal overlaps and connections across areas of interesting and methodological approaches. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features researchers, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, the University will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration. 

COVID Modifications:
In an effort to be responsive to changing health/safety protocol, Red Hot Research will be held in the main space of The Commons, with limited seating. Refreshments will be provided after the presentations in the Weaver Courtyard, outside.

Presenters:

Allison Kirkpatrick (she/her/hers), Physics & Astronomy, Black Holes, Galaxies
Bing Pu (she/her/hers), Geography & Atmospheric Science, African Dust, Long-range Transport, Air Quality
Sylvia Fernández (she/her/hers), Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities/The Commons/Hall Center for the Humanities, Borderlands, Testimonios, Intersectionalities, Memory, Mapping, Literature, Border Women
Fithawee Tzeggai (he/him/his), Sociology, Educational Equity, Sociology of Knowledge, Civil Rights Protest, The Coleman Report, Education Research

Care & Well-being, Coffee @ The Commons, Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
10:00-11:00am CT Friday, October 1, 2021 Online

Presented in partnership with the Hall Center for the Humanities

What is the role of journalists in reporting stories shared through #MeToo?
What happens in cases when sources do not agree on events?
What extra considerations must journalists make when interviewing vulnerable populations?

Irin Carmon is a senior correspondent at New York Magazine. In 2017-18, Carmon worked with the Washington Post and reporter Amy Brittain to break the news of sexual harassment and assault allegations against Charlie Rose, as well as CBS's knowledge of his conduct. She speaks frequently on women's leadership and rights.

Coffee @ The Commons is a conversation-style event, which offers space for informal dialogue with visiting scholars. Conversation Guide: Patricia Weems Gaston, KU School of Journalism & Mass Communications.

Irin Carmon will deliver the Emily Taylor and Marilyn Stokstad Women’s Leadership Lecture at 7:30pm CT on Thursday, September 30 for the Hall Center for the Humanities.

Link to Register in Zoom.

Care & Well-being, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Research Communication
3:00-4:00pm CT Thursday, September 30, 2021 Online

Connect with scholars across humanities-arts-health disciplines around potential project ideas in response to a new CDC funding opportunity. The Research Development team from the KU Office of Research will present on the specific RFP. Those in attendance will have an opportunity to meet colleagues across disciplines and share about their interest in this topic.

Zoom Registration Link.

The Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative is a developing platform to:

  • Create connections across professionals and among researchers around affinities within the realm of health and wellness;
  • Connect researchers to funding opportunities around health and wellness; and
  • Offer a platform for collaboration around existing and emerging health-related challenges.
Care & Well-being, Discussion
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, September 30, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; with support from the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Environmental Studies Program.

Moderated by Katie Batza, associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this session will explore how we negotiate conflicts and repair relationships in the context of the pandemic.  Participants are encouraged, but not required, to read excerpts of Sarah Schulman’s Conflict Is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility, and the Duty of Repair (Content warning: violence, including domestic violence, police violence, and state violence) or listen to her interview with Sam Sanders (link to interview.)

Zoom Registration Link.

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