Event Archive

Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
1:00-2:00pm CDT Thursday, May 13, 2021 Online
Presented by the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative

Learn about this new seed funding opportunity for scholars, students, and community collaborators.

For more details on the grants, this is a link to more information.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Activity, Care & Well-being, Discussion
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, May 6, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art; with support from the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring

Casey Mesick Braun (Curator of Global Indigenous Art at the Spencer Museum of Art), and Cara Weeks Neuburger (ATR, LCPC at Sunflower Art Therapy), will co-facilitate a session that explores how art can promote well-being, adaptability, and self-care. Casey will lead a slow exploration of a newly commissioned artwork currently on view in the exhibition Healing, Knowing, Seeing the Body at the Spencer Museum of Art, offering an opportunity for pause, reflection, and contemplation. Cara will then guide us through an art-making activity to promote creative ways for self-care. No special materials are required. 

Link to Zoom Registration.

Activity, Care & Well-being, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Humans in a More Than Human World
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, April 22, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art; with support from the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring

How might thinking with plants and animals allow us a different lens through which to see our present world and histories—and help to imagine futures? What do we learn when we seek alternative sources of wisdom, ones that resist narratives of productivity, accumulation, and disposability? How can we practice listening to our intuition, to our own heart? This session will explore and inspire the cultivation of personal and creative practices that deepen our relationships with the more-than-human persons who live with and around us. We’ll explore possibilities for collaboration through a look at the prairie divination project, a brief introduction to divination, as well as a shared practice. Led by poet and associate professor of English, Megan Kaminski.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Book Talk
7:00-8:00pm CDT Wednesday, April 21, 2021 Online
Presented by the Lawrence Public Library and Independence Inc.

Growing up as a paralyzed girl during the 90s and early 2000s, Rebekah Taussig only saw disability depicted as something monstrous (The Hunchback of Notre Dame), inspirational (Helen Keller), or angelic (Forrest Gump). None of this felt right; and as she got older, she longed for more stories that allowed disability to be complex and ordinary, uncomfortable and fine, painful and fulfilling.

In Sitting Pretty she writes about the rhythms and textures of what it means to live in a body that doesn’t fit. Rebekah reflects on everything from the complications of kindness and charity, living both independently and dependently, experiencing intimacy, and how the pervasiveness of ableism in our everyday media directly translates to everyday life.

Disability affects all of us, directly or indirectly, at one point or another. By exploring this truth in poignant and lyrical essays, Taussig illustrates the need for more stories and more voices to understand the diversity of humanity. Sitting Pretty challenges us as a society to be patient and vigilant, practical and imaginative, kind and relentless, as we set to work to write an entirely different story.

Rebekah Taussig, Ph.D. is a Kansas City writer and teacher with her doctorate in Creative Nonfiction and Disability Studies. She has led workshops and presentations at the University of Michigan, University of Kansas, and Davidson College on disability representation, identity, and community. She is also the recipient of the Hefner Heitz Kansas Book Award in Literary Nonfiction for Sitting Pretty. The award is sponsored by the Center for Kansas Studies, the Thomas Fox Averill Kansas Studies Collection at Mabee Library and the Friends of Mabee Library. You can find Taussig on Instagram @sitting_pretty.

Hannah Soyer is a queer disabled writer and MFA candidate in Creative Writing at the University of Kansas. She is the founder of This Body is Worthy, a project aimed at celebrating bodies outside of mainstream societal ideals, and Words of Reclamation, a space for disabled writers.

Link to Zoom Webinar.

Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
12:00-1:00pm CDT Thursday, April 15, 2021 Online
Presented by the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative

Led by Sarah Bishop, Executive Director of Coneflower Consulting

Learn the ins and outs of applying for funding for arts research from federal agencies and foundations. This session will provide context and tools for researchers working in and with the arts.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Discussion, Framing the Dialogue, Humans in a More Than Human World
Heather McTeer Toney, Climate Justice Liaison, Environmental Defense Fund
12:30-1:30pm CT Wednesday, April 14, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the Environmental Studies Program, and the KU Departments of African and African-American Studies, English, Geography and Atmospheric Science, and Geology; the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; the Global Grasslands CoLAB; the KU Sawyer Seminar; the Office of Multicultural Affairs; the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative; and the University Honors Program.

Elected at age 27, Heather McTeer Toney was the first African-American person, first female, and the youngest person to serve as Mayor of Greenville, Mississippi from 2004-2012. In 2014, she was appointed by President Barack Obama as Regional Administrator for Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Southeast Region. She is a national figure in the areas of public service, environmental justice, and community engagement. She currently serves as the Climate Justice Liaison for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Senior Advisor to Moms Clean Air Force, two affiliated organizations that represent more than 3 million climate and environment allies committed to fighting climate change and protecting children from the dangers of air pollution.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Discussion, Humans in a More Than Human World
12:00-1:00pm CDT Tuesday, April 13, 2021 Online
Presented by The Commons, the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity, the Center for Service Learning, and the KU Civic Engagement Ambassadors

This series features experts on different aspects of US democracy, and centers opportunities for civic engagement. Panelists will share from their own experiences about opportunities and challenges, giving attendees a chance to consider how their unique perspectives can inform civic participation and processes. The event is an opportunity to ask questions of local experts who study and work in this realm.

Programs in this series feature campus resources as well as specialists beyond the University. In Part VII: Climate Policy & Action, presenters will speak on topics that bear relevance to faculty, staff, and students at KU as well as the broader community.

Panelists:
Melek Ben-Ayed (he/him), Mechanical Engineering Students / KU Sunrise Movement Vice President
Connie Fitzpatrick (she/her), Douglas County Sustainability Office
Lisa Larsen (she/her), Environmental Geologist / Lawrence City Commissioner
Ward Lyles (he/him), KU School of Public Affairs & Administration / Center for Compassionate & Sustainable Communities

Link to Zoom Registration.

7:30pm CDT Thursday, April 8, 2021 Online
Presented by The Commons and the KU Department of English Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lectureship with Paper Plains Literary Festival.

Paper Plains is honored to welcome Hanif Abdurraqib to deliver the Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture, presented by the Commons and the University of Kansas Department of English. Abdurraqib will discuss his groundbreaking new book A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance. Abdurraqib will be joined in conversation by Dr. Eve L. Ewing.

A stirring meditation on Black performance in America from the New York Times bestselling author of Go Ahead in the Rain, A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance is the latest book from Hanif Abdurraqib.

At the March on Washington in 1963, Josephine Baker was fifty-seven years old, well beyond her most prolific days. But in her speech she was in a mood to consider her life, her legacy, her departure from the country she was now triumphantly returning to. “I was a devil in other countries, and I was a little devil in America, too,” she told the crowd. Inspired by these few words, Hanif Abdurraqib has written a profound and lasting reflection on how Black performance is inextricably woven into the fabric of American culture. Each moment in every performance he examines—whether it’s the twenty-seven seconds in “Gimme Shelter” in which Merry Clayton wails the words “rape, murder,” a schoolyard fistfight, a dance marathon, or the instant in a game of spades right after the cards are dealt—has layers of resonance in Black and white cultures, the politics of American empire, and Abdurraqib’s own personal history of love, grief, and performance.

Abdurraqib writes prose brimming with jubilation and pain, infused with the lyricism and rhythm of the musicians he loves. With care and generosity, he explains the poignancy of performances big and small, each one feeling intensely familiar and vital, both timeless and desperately urgent. Filled with sharp insight, humor, and heart, A Little Devil in America exalts the Black performance that unfolds in specific moments in time and space—from midcentury Paris to the moon, and back down again to a cramped living room in Columbus, Ohio.

Crowdcast registration link.

Poster design by Ash Aranda.

Care & Well-being, Discussion, Graduate Student Event
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, April 8, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art; with support from the Environmental Studies Program, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring

Led by the Graduate Student Collective of the Center for Compassionate & Sustainable Communities, this session focuses on sustainable community building at a time when feeling isolated is easy. Discussion will include ideas for creating community. CAPS (Counseling and Psychological Services) will also be available to help answer questions; offer resources; and share guidance for how to maintain healthy relationships with our surrounding environments.

Link to Zoom Registration.

Care & Well-being, Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
4:00-5:00pm CDT Tuesday, April 6, 2021 Online

This is the eighth monthly meet-up for the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative.

Link to more information about the Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative.

This Zoom gathering will feature:

  • a presentation on the Kansas Serves Native American Families Project by Project Director Michelle Levy (School of Social Welfare) and Project Manager Maria Fairman (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska/Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation)
  • breakout discussions around core themes

Link to Zoom Registration.

 

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