Event Archive

Lecture, Public Event
7:00-8:30pm Tuesday, March 26, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Office of First-Year Experience, the KU Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum, and The Commons

Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, by Edwidge Danticat, establishes a connection between species and climate, highlighting the vulnerability that accompanies interdependence. Danticat examines the precarious balance between humans and the living Earth. This discussion extends to a broader perspective on the natural environment that we and other species inhabit.

This event will feature images and accounts of first-hand experiences with one of the most spectacular species of lizards — Anolis eugenegrahami, a spindly-legged species found only on and around waterfalls in Haiti — as it considers the larger context of species distribution. Today, the stream is dry, the trees are gone, and the fate of the lizards is unknown.

Faculty Event, Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, March 22, 2019 The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, around common themes. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.  

Presenters:
Alcides Velasquez, Communication Studies, Social media, Political communication, Latinos, Political participation
Tim Pleskac, Psychology / Cofrin Logan Center for Addiction Research & Treatment, Decision to Shoot, Police, Race Bias
Alice Bean, Physics & Astronomy, U.S. Department of State, Opportunities for Work in Science and Policy
David Braaten, Geography & Atmospheric Science / Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets, Climate Change

Emcee:
Celka Straughn, Spencer Museum of Art

Discussion, Framing the Dialogue
11:00am-12:00pm Friday, March 22, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Office of Multicultural Affairs and The Commons

with
Maryemma Graham, English, The Project on the History of Black Writing
Dave Tell, Communication Studies
Giselle Anatol, English, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Joo Ok Kim, American Studies

This discussion will examine the ways in which Jesmyn Ward writes about and relates to the South. The speakers represent a range of disciplines, and in their individual research, each of them explores elements of this storied region. Building on individual expertise, this conversation will extend to the work of Ward and the more nuanced ways of considering her home state -- Mississippi.


This program is offered in conjunction with the Humanities Lecture Series event on April 11, hosted by the Hall Center for the Humanities and featuring Jesmyn Ward.
Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Tuesday, February 19, 2019, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, Tuesday, May 7, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:
• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Framing the Dialogue, Public Event
7:00pm Tuesday, March 5, 2019 Liberty Hall
Supported by The Commons, the Raven Book Store, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Office of Research, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, and the Office of the Provost

Hieu Minh Nguyen is the author of This Way to the Sugar, (Write Bloody Press, 2014) which was a finalist for both a Minnesota Book Awards and a Lambda Literary Awards. His most recent work, Not Here, was released via Coffee House Press in April, 2018.

A queer Vietnamese American poet, Hieu is a Kundiman fellow and a poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine. His work has also appeared in the Southern Indiana Review, Guernica, Ninth Letter, Devil's Lake, Bat City Review, the Paris-American, and elsewhere. Hieu is a nationally touring poet, performer, and teaching artist. He lives in Minneapolis.

Tickets are free and available here: https://www.universe.com/events/hieu-minh-nguyen-tickets-lawrence-8CLRNM

Graduate Student Event
9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Tuesday, February 19, 2019, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, Tuesday, May 7, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:
• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person. The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

Graduate Student Event, Red Hot Research
4:00-5:30pm Friday, March 1, 2019 The Commons

Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each.

Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

Presenters:
Mariah Crystal, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Kaylee Herzog, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Daniel Chick, Communication Studies
Jennifer Cooper, Physics and Astronomy

Emcee:
Pegah Naemi, Social Psychology

Panel
7:00-8:30pm Thursday, February 28, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the Hall Center for the Humanities and The Commons

Join us for a discussion featuring experts whose work with microbial populations, such as those used for fermentation, includes scientific research, food production, artistic possibility. Free and open to the public.

 

 

Sandor Katz, food writer and activist
S.E. Nash, artist
Josie Chandler, Dept. of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas

Sandor Katz the Hall Center for the Humanities Interdisciplinary Scholar in Residence. He is a food writer, DIY food activist, and author, based in Tennessee. He experiments widely with fermentation, encourages at-home exploration, and promotes the consumption of live-culture foods. Katz extols the health virtues of fermented foods, which he personally uses as part of his treatment for AIDS. His 2012 book,The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World, received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. In 2014, he received the Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Public Event
7:00pm Tuesday, February 26, 2019 Lawrence Public Library
Supported by the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Lawrence Public Library, and The Commons

Sandor Katz is the Hall Center for the Humanities' Interdisciplinary Scholar in Residence. He is a food writer, DIY food activist, and author, based in Tennessee. He experiments widely with fermentation, encourages at-home exploration, and promotes the consumption of live-culture foods. Katz extols the health virtues of fermented foods, which he personally uses as part of his treatment for AIDS. His 2012 book, The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World, received a James Beard award and was a finalist at the International Association of Culinary Professionals. In 2014, he received the Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Sandor Katz will speak about his work in microbial realms and what drives his passion for fermented foods. Conversation with the audience will follow. Free and open to the public.

Panel
3:30-5:00pm Thursday, February 21, 2019 The Commons
Supported by the College Office of Graduate Affairs

A workshop for graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This panel discussion and Q&A will address questions of publishing in journals for graduate students in the social sciences and humanities.

  • How do you find the right journals?
  • How often and when should you accept opportunities to write book reviews?
  • What should I consider about open access journals?
     

Clarence Lang, PhD, Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; Professor of African and African-American Studies, American Studies
Ada Emmett, MLIS, Director of the KU Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright
Ludwin Molina, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Psychology

 

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