Care & Well-being

The pressures and expectations that confront humans are constantly changing, and can become all-consuming. Amid efforts to be fully present, show up for others, and integrate professional and personal, how do we devote time and intention to care for ourselves, both in community and as individuals? Through programs associated with Care and Well-being, The Commons and collaborative partners will explore the ways in which we can better understand the practice and components of care and well-being.

Questions for exploration include:

  • How do communities make space for individual care?
  • How does research on care connect to practice?
  • Can stigmas associated with stress be overcome? And associations with selfcare be reimagined?
  • Who has access to services and institutions that provide opportunities for care?
  • What is the relationship between social justice and care?
  • How are the concepts of health and well-being the same/different?
  • What does care look like beyond systems of Healthcare?
  • How do the expectations in higher education compare to those in other realms?
  • How is the university a fertile ground for addressing these ideas?

Coming Events

Care & Well-being, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Research Communication
3:00-4:00pm CT Thursday, September 30, 2021 Online

Connect with scholars across humanities-arts-health disciplines around potential project ideas in response to a new CDC funding opportunity. The Research Development team from the KU Office of Research will present on the specific RFP. Those in attendance will have an opportunity to meet colleagues across disciplines and share about their interest in this topic.

Zoom Registration Link.

The Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative is a developing platform to:

  • Create connections across professionals and among researchers around affinities within the realm of health and wellness;
  • Connect researchers to funding opportunities around health and wellness; and
  • Offer a platform for collaboration around existing and emerging health-related challenges.
Of interest to:
Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students
Care & Well-being, Discussion
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, September 30, 2021 Online
Hosted by The Commons, the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities, and the Spencer Museum of Art, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity; with support from the Center for Faculty Development and Mentoring, the Center for Teaching Excellence, and the Environmental Studies Program.

Moderated by Katie Batza, associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this session will explore how we negotiate conflicts and repair relationships in the context of the pandemic.  Participants are encouraged, but not required, to read excerpts of Sarah Schulman’s Conflict Is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility, and the Duty of Repair (Content warning: violence, including domestic violence, police violence, and state violence) or listen to her interview with Sam Sanders (link to interview.)

Zoom Registration Link.

Of interest to:
Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students
Care & Well-being, Coffee @ The Commons, Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
10:00-11:00am CT Friday, October 1, 2021 Online

Presented in partnership with the Hall Center for the Humanities

What is the role of journalists in reporting stories shared through #MeToo?
What happens in cases when sources do not agree on events?
What extra considerations must journalists make when interviewing vulnerable populations?

Irin Carmon is a senior correspondent at New York Magazine. In 2017-18, Carmon worked with the Washington Post and reporter Amy Brittain to break the news of sexual harassment and assault allegations against Charlie Rose, as well as CBS's knowledge of his conduct. She speaks frequently on women's leadership and rights.

Coffee @ The Commons is a conversation-style event, which offers space for informal dialogue with visiting scholars. Conversation Guide: Patricia Weems Gaston, KU School of Journalism & Mass Communications.

Irin Carmon will deliver the Emily Taylor and Marilyn Stokstad Women’s Leadership Lecture at 7:30pm CT on Thursday, September 30 for the Hall Center for the Humanities.

Link to Register in Zoom.

Of interest to:
Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students
Book Talk, Care & Well-being, Humans in a More Than Human World, Public Event
5:30-7:00pm Wednesday, October 6, 2021 The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Department of English, The Commons, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Project on the History of Black Writing, and the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities

Michael Kleber-Diggs is the author of Worldly Things, for which he won the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. His poems offer guidance on ways forward—toward radical kindness and a socially responsible poetics. “Let’s create folklore side-by-side,” he urges, asking us to aspire to a form of nurturing defined by tenderness, to a kind of community devoted to mutual prosperity. “All of us want,” after all, “our share of light, and just enough rainfall.”

Kleber-Diggs was born and raised in Kansas and now lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. His work has appeared in Lit Hub, the Rumpus, Rain Taxi, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Water~Stone Review, Midway Review, North  Dakota Quarterly and a few anthologies. Michael teaches poetry and creative non-fiction through the Minnesota Prison Writers Workshop.

Book sales will be provided on-site by KU Bookstore.

Of interest to:
All Ages, Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students
Care & Well-being, Coffee @ The Commons, Discussion, Humans in a More Than Human World, Student Event
3:00-4:00pm Wednesday, October 6, 2021 The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Department of English, The Commons, the Spencer Museum of Art, the Project on the History of Black Writing, and the IPSR Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities

Michael Kleber-Diggs is the author of Worldly Things, for which he won the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. His poems offer guidance on ways forward—toward radical
kindness and a socially responsible poetics. “Let’s create folklore side-by-side,” he urges, asking us to aspire to a form of nurturing defined by tenderness, to a kind of
community devoted to mutual prosperity. “All of us want,” after all, “our share of light, and just enough rainfall.”

Join Michael Kleber-Diggs for Coffee @ The Commons prior to the reading. Coffee @ The Commons is a series that offers space for more informal dialogues with visiting scholars.

Of interest to:
All Ages, Faculty, General Public, Graduate students, Researchers, Staff, Undergraduate Students

Past Events

Activity, Care & Well-being
12:00-1:00pm CT Thursday, September 16, 2021 Online
Activity, Care & Well-being, Discussion
12:00-1:00pm Thursday, September 2, 2021 The Commons
Activity, Care & Well-being, Discussion
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, May 6, 2021 Online
Activity, Care & Well-being, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative, Humans in a More Than Human World
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, April 22, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion, Graduate Student Event
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, April 8, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion, Health Humanities and Arts Research Collaborative
4:00-5:00pm CDT Tuesday, April 6, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, March 25, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, March 11, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion, Faculty Event, Student Event
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, February 25, 2021 Online
Care & Well-being, Discussion, Faculty Event, Graduate Student Event, The Future University, Undergraduate Student Event
11:00am-12:00pm CT Thursday, February 11, 2021 Online

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